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Indianhead Kids T-Shirts

Description

The Bell UH-1 Iroquois (nicknamed "Huey") is a military helicopter powered by a single turboshaft engine, with two-blade main and tail rotors. The first member of the prolific Huey family, it was developed by Bell Helicopter to meet a United States Army's 1952 requirement for a medical evacuation and utility helicopter, and first flew in 1956. The UH-1 was the first turbine-powered helicopter to enter production in 1960 for the United States military, and more than 16,000 have been built since. The Iroquois was originally designated HU-1, hence the Huey nickname, which has remained in common use, despite the official redesignation to UH-1 in 1962. The UH-1 first saw service in combat operations during the Vietnam War, with around 7,000 helicopters deployed. The Bell 204 and 205 are Iroquois versions developed for the civil market.

Tags: agent-carter, uh1h, star, 6th, pers

Description

The primary mission of Civil Affairs is to conduct civil-military operations. Civil Affairs soldiers are responsible for executing five core CA tasks, Civil Information Management, Foreign Humanitarian Assistance, Nation Assistance, Population and Resource Control, and Support to Civil Administration. Some sub tasks to these core tasks include identifying non-governmental and international organizations operating in the battlespace, handling refugees, civilians on the battlefield, and determining protected targets such as schools, churches/temples/mosques, hospitals, etc. Civil Affairs units are the field commander's link to the civil authorities in that commander's area of operations. The soldiers make up teams which interface and provide expertise to the host nation government. USACAPOC(A)'s Civil Affairs soldiers are particularly suited for this mission since they are Army Reserve soldiers with civilian occupations such as law enforcement, engineering, medicine, law, banking, public administration, etc.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Civil Affairs Kids T-Shirt

by twix123844
$18
Description

Recon Team Diamondback was one of the original Spike Recon teams to operate out of Da Nang and was named prior to the 'State Naming' of Recon Teams from Command and Control North. (Later teams were also to use Snake names). In operation as early as 1963 Recon team Diamondback operated from FOB 4 (Forward Operations Base 4) which was Special Forces Detachment C-1 at Da Nang. Diamondback were in place at Da Nang from the inception of MACV-SOG CCN and were reallocated Mike Force Operations in 1968 at Detachment B-16 as a Forward Recon Element throughout the DMZ.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The United States Cavalry, or U.S. Cavalry, was the designation of the mounted force of the United States Army from the late 18th to the early 20th century. The Cavalry branch became the Armor branch in 1950, but the term "Cavalry" remains in use in the U.S. Army for mounted (ground and aviation) reconnaissance, security, and target acquisition (RSTA) units based on their parent Combat Arms Regimental System (CARS) regiment. Cavalry is also used in the name of the 1st Cavalry Division for heraldic/lineage/historical purposes.The U.S. Cavalry branch was absorbed into the Armor branch as part of the Army Reorganization Act of 1950. The Vietnam War saw the introduction of helicopters and operations as a helicopter-borne force with the designation of Air Cavalry, while mechanized cavalry received the designation of Armored Cavalry.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Army Cavalry Kids T-Shirt

by twix123844
$18
Description

Today the 108th Division is known as the 108th Division (Institutional Training). The 108th Infantry Division was a World War II ghost division. It was only after the war that the Army officially made a 108th Division. Post-World War II and the 108th Airborne Division The 108th Division was activated in 1946 following World War II. Then called the 108th Airborne Division, it was headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. The division's nickname, the Golden Griffons, was born from its initial air-ground mission. Griffons are legendary animals from Greek mythology who are half-lion, half-eagle and eight times the size of a lion. Known for their courage and ferocity, griffons were so feared by ancient people that rulers of Asian provinces used them to guard their vast treasures. Its airborne status lasted until 1952. In 1952, the division was reorganized into an infantry division and its headquarters was moved to its present location in Charlotte, North Carolina with all its subordinate units located in either North or South Carolina. In 1954, the division helped test a new method of rifle qualification known as "trainfire." In 1956, the division was selected to serve as a prototype for an Army Training Division. This meant reorganizing again to conduct basic and advanced individual training, should the division be called to active duty. In the 1960's, the division established its own drill sergeant school patterned after the active component school. In 1968, the 108th Division was restructured under its current brigade concept. During the Vietnam era, 108th Division soldiers during annual training were used to conduct interim training for soldiers waiting to begin basic training. In the 1980's the division developed an updated and more practical mobilization plan. During those same years the division began conducting basic training at Fort Jackson under new Mobilization Army Training Center and Provisional Training concepts. In January of 1991, more than 300 108th Division soldiers were called to active duty to support Operation Desert Storm, marking the first mobilization ever for members of the 108th Division. Division soldiers assisted in the retraining of individual soldiers at Fort Jackson who were called back to military duty. In late 1993, the 108th Division accepted the mission to pilot a new concept in Army training called Future Army Schools Twenty-first Century. This not only expanded the geographic size of the 108th Division to add the states of Georgia and Florida, but added 10 new U.S Army Reserve Forces Schools to the division's force structure. Those schools were later reorganized into functionally-aligned school brigades. This gave the 108th Division a new mission. While keeping the mission of conducting initial entry training for new soldiers entering the Army, it now conducts specialized skill training for thousands of soldiers, both officers and enlisted, in the southeastern part of the United States. In 1993, the Division was reorganized into two IET training brigades, a training support brigade, and four school brigades responsible for training IET soldiers missions and providing enlisted and officer courses within Region "C". The school brigades teach enlisted MOS producing courses, BNCOC and ANCOC enlisted advanced training courses, and in the case of one brigade, professional development courses to officers. This training is provided in both IDT and AT formats to the U.S. Army Reserves and National Guard across the four states comprising Region "C" In 1996 the 108th Division was assigned another completely new mission as part of a pilot project to conduct Reserve Officer Training Corps training at three colleges and universities in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. That pilot now has been expanded nationally and the 108th Division formally added a ROTC group to its organizational structure. In October of 1998, the 108th Division assumed command and control of the former 265th US Army Forces School in Puerto Rico, which added an 8th Brigade. In 2001, the ROTC units were officially reorganized into a brigade, bringing the division to a total force of nine brigades. In 2004, further reorganization of the Army Reserve resulted in the division assuming command of units in both Alabama and Mississippi. It is still unknown how this change will affect the division's force structure.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The Sapper Tab is a military badge of the United States Army which was authorized on June 28, 2004 by the Army Chief of Staff, General Peter Schoomaker. To be awarded the Sapper Tab, a service member may or may not hold the military occupation specialty code (MOS) designation as a Combat Engineer (Sapper), but must have graduated from the Sapper Leader Course (SLC), that the U.S. Army Engineer School at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, operates. The school falls under the 169th Engineer Battalion, 1st Engineer Brigade. This award is retroactive back to the graduates of the first SLC on June 14, 1985. The Sapper Leader Course is a 28-day course designed to train joint-service leaders in small unit tactics, leadership skills, and tactics required to perform as part of a combined arms team.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

Public Affairs is a term for the formal offices of the branches of the United States Department of Defense whose purpose is to deal with the media and community issues. The term is also used for numerous media relations offices that are created by the U.S. military for more specific limited purposes. Public affairs offices are staffed by a combination of officers, enlisted personnel, civilian officials and contract professionals. Public Affairs offices play a key role in contingency and deployed operations. The typical Public Affairs office is led by an officer who is in charge of planning, budgeting for, executing and evaluating the effectiveness of public affairs programs, and provides public affairs advice, counsel and support for commanders and senior staff members.

Tags: agent-carter, car, divarty, action, desert

Description

The 4th Infantry Division deployed from Fort Lewis to Camp Holloway, Pleiku, Vietnam on 25 September 1966 and served more than four years, returning to Fort Carson, Colorado on 8 December 1970. Two brigades operated in the Central Highlands/II Corps Zone, but its 3rd Brigade, including the division's armor battalion, was sent to Tay Ninh Province northwest of Saigon to take part in Operation Attleboro (September to November 1966), and later Operation Junction City (February to May 1967), both in War Zone C. After nearly a year of combat, the 3rd Brigade's battalions officially became part of the 25th Infantry Division in exchange for the battalions of the 25th's 3rd Brigade, then in Quang Ngai Province as part of the division-sized Task Force Oregon.

Tags: agent-carter, ivy, 4th, republic, arvn

Description

The Douglas DC-3 is a fixed-wing propeller-driven airliner. Its cruise speed (207 mph or 333 km/h) and range (1,500 mi or 2,400 km) revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Its lasting effect on the airline industry and World War II makes it one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made.

Tags: agent-carter, train, trqain, sky, skytrain

DC3 w Jumpers Kids T-Shirt

by twix123844
$18
Description

Old obsolete Canadian cloth Air Force parachute wings from the 1950's. These wings have the gold maple leaf.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

During the Vietnam War K Company (RANGER), 75TH Infantry (Airborne) was on the active roles of the United States Army from 1 February 1969 to 10 December1970. The Ranger Companies of the Viet Nam War were in continuous combat longer than organized companies of Rangers in any other war, then or since.

Tags: agent-carter, vn, 75th, co, k

Description

The Canadian Airborne Regiment is the most well known users of the Canadian Jump Wings from its formation in April 1968 to March 1995. Canadian Paratroopers with Canadian Jump Wings date back to the days of the 1st Special Service Force and 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion of World War II. Currently members of JTF2, foreign service members who complete the Canadian basic parachutist course will receive the jump wings, and after the disbandment of the Canadian Airborne Regiment in 1995, the Canadian army reverted to its former practice of maintaining a parachute company within one of the battalions of each of the regular infantry regiments. The soldiers, at that time, returned to their regimental "homes" and became a company of the light battalion of each of their regiments (the 3rd Battalion The Royal Canadian Regiment, the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry and the 3rd Battalion Royal 22e Régiment).

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 75th Ranger Regiment, also known as Rangers, or within JSOC as Task Force Red, is a light infantry, special operations unit of the United States Army. The regiment is headquartered at Fort Benning, Georgia and is composed of one special troops battalion and three ranger battalions. The regiment is the U.S. Army's premier raid force, with specialized skills that enable them to perform a variety of missions. These include direct action, airfield seizure, airborne and air assaults, special reconnaissance, personnel recovery, and high-value target raids. It operates as a special operations force under the United States Army Special Operations Command

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

Sergeant (abbreviated to Sgt and capitalised when used as a named person's title) is a rank in many uniformed organizations, principally military and policing forces. Its origin is the Latin serviens, "one who serves", through the French term sergent. The term "sergeant" refers to a non-commissioned officer placed above the rank of a corporal and a police officer immediately below a lieutenant.[1] In most armies the rank of sergeant corresponds to command of a squad (or section). In Commonwealth armies, it is a more senior rank, corresponding roughly to a platoon second-in-command. In the United States Army, sergeant is a more junior rank corresponding to a four-soldier fireteam leader.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The United States Army Aviation Branch is the administrative organization within the United States Army responsible for doctrine, manning and configuration for all aviation units. After the United States Army Air Corps grew into the Army Air Forces and split into the new service, the United States Air Force, the Army was left with its sole fixed-wing aviation units flying L-2 observation planes for artillery units. The Army would develop a new concept of aviation using the helicopter that would show promise during the Korean War and would revolutionize warfare during the Vietnam War.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 95th Military Police Battalion was the largest, most geographically dispersed Military Police battalion in the United States Army. It was last located in Sembach, Germany, the unit fell under the command of the 18th Military Police Brigade.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

the National Training Center in 1980, the OPFOR consisted of a detachment of infantry from the 7th Infantry Division US Army based in Fort Ord, California, and the 1st Bn, 73rd Armor. Once the US Army turned to regimental units in 1985.The OPFOR soldiers wore Soviet-style armor uniforms including black berets and Soviet-style insignias, and used M551 Sheridan tanks visually modified to resemble BMP-1 vehicles and T-72 tanks.

Tags: agent-carter, 6th, pers, personnel, p

Description

The Army Nurse Corps stopped being all-female in 1955; that year Edward L.T. Lyon was the first man to receive a commission in the Army Nurse Corps. During the Vietnam War many Army nurses would see deployment to South East Asia. Army nurses would staff all major Army hospitals in the theatre, including: Cam Ranh Bay, Da Nang, and Saigon. Vietnam would be the first major deployment of men as nurses into the combat theater, as men could be located in more hazardous locations than what was considered safe for females. Many Army nurses faced enemy fire for the first time due to the unconventional nature of the conflict, and several nurses would die from direct enemy fire. On at least one occasion the US Army hospital at Cam Ranh Bay was assaulted and severely damaged, with a loss of both patient and staff life.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 57th Infantry Regiment was a unit in the Philippine Scouts. During their combat in Bataan members received 1 Medal of Honor, 21 Distinguished Service Crosses and 68 Silver Stars.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

In September 2002, the 1st Peronnel Services Battalion was inactivated. The Battalion's remaining detachments were to be reorganized under a different III Corps personnel battalion. The 1st Personnel Services Battalion's mission was to on order, deploy by air, rail and/or sea, establish a personnel services battalion area of operations, provide direct personnel service support to designated units be prepared to relocate the battalion, provide for the defense, security and life support of all assigned and attached personnel, and, on order, redeploy upon completion of the mission.

Tags: agent-carter, personnel, p, diamond, will

Description

To earn the Military Freefall Badge, the military member first must receive all necessary ground training, already have earned the Parachutist Badge (jump-qualified), and must have completed the requisite freefall (night, combat equipment, oxygen) jumps. The Military Freefall Course is taught by B Company, 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Warfare Training Group (Airborne) and lasts four weeks. The four week course is conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, where students conduct airborne operations.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

There were nine major support commands in Vietnam, and also supervised 71 smaller units under the organizational titles "offices", "agencies", "groups", "facilities", "centers", "depots", "teams", "activities", "elements", "companies", and "detachments". Its nine major commands were: 1st Logistics Command 1st Aviation Brigade 18th Military Police Brigade 34th General Support Group 44th Medical Brigade 525th Military Intelligence Group U.S. Army Security Agency Group U.S. Army Engineer Command (Provisional) U.S. Army Headquarters Area Command (USAHAC)

Tags: agent-carter, personnel, p, diamond, will

Description

Medical evacuation, often termed Medevac or Medivac, is the timely and efficient movement and en route care provided by medical personnel to wounded being evacuated from a battlefield, to injured patients being evacuated from the scene of an accident to receiving medical facilities, or to patients at a rural hospital requiring urgent care at a better-equipped facility using medically equipped ground vehicles (ambulances) or aircraft (air ambulances)

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The Sapper Tab is a military badge of the United States Army which was authorized on June 28, 2004 by the Army Chief of Staff, General Peter Schoomaker. To be awarded the Sapper Tab, a service member may or may not hold the military occupation specialty code (MOS) designation as a Combat Engineer (Sapper), but must have graduated from the Sapper Leader Course (SLC), that the U.S. Army Engineer School at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, operates. The school falls under the 169th Engineer Battalion, 1st Engineer Brigade. This award is retroactive back to the graduates of the first SLC on June 14, 1985.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 94th Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I, and of the Organized Reserve Corps in 1921 until 1942. The 94th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War II, and of the United States Army Reserve from 1956 until 1963. It continued in the Army Reserve as the 94th Command Headquarters (Divisional) from 1963 until the Army's realignment of reserve component combat arms into the Army National Guard in 1967. The 94th Army Reserve Command (later redesignated 94th Regional Support Command and 94th Regional Readiness Command) was a regional command and control headquarters over most United States Army Reserve units throughout the six New England states of Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. For forty years, beginning in the late 1960s, the United States Army Reserve was divided up into a varying number of regional, branch-immaterial commands. Originally designated "army reserve commands" ("ARCOMs"), several were disbanded in and around 1995, while the remainder were redesignated "regional support commands" ("RSCs") at that time and re-dubbed "regional readiness commands" ("RRCs") in 2001. In addition to the RRCs, several mission-oriented commands were established, including such as training divisions and engineer commands. Like most RRCs, the 94th Regional Readiness Command was scheduled to be deactivated in fiscal year 2009 as part of the Army Reserve's reorganisation into a functionally based command structure reporting to respective major Army commands ("MACOMs"); plans were altered, the 94th became a training division headquartered at Fort Lee.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

Public Affairs is a term for the formal offices of the branches of the United States Department of Defense whose purpose is to deal with the media and community issues. The term is also used for numerous media relations offices that are created by the U.S. military for more specific limited purposes. Public affairs offices are staffed by a combination of officers, enlisted personnel, civilian officials and contract professionals. Public Affairs offices play a key role in contingency and deployed operations. The typical Public Affairs office is led by an officer who is in charge of planning, budgeting for, executing and evaluating the effectiveness of public affairs programs, and provides public affairs advice, counsel and support for commanders and senior staff members.

Tags: agent-carter, regt, sqdrn, squadron, regiment

Description

The Sapper Tab is a military badge of the United States Army which was authorized on June 28, 2004 by the Army Chief of Staff, General Peter Schoomaker. To be awarded the Sapper Tab, a service member may or may not hold the military occupation specialty code (MOS) designation as a Combat Engineer (Sapper), but must have graduated from the Sapper Leader Course (SLC), that the U.S. Army Engineer School at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, operates. The school falls under the 169th Engineer Battalion, 1st Engineer Brigade. This award is retroactive back to the graduates of the first SLC on June 14, 1985.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

SAPPER Tab Kids T-Shirt

by twix123844
$18
Description

The 75th Ranger Regiment, also known as Rangers, or within JSOC as Task Force Red, is a light infantry, special operations unit of the United States Army. The regiment is headquartered at Fort Benning, Georgia and is composed of one special troops battalion and three ranger battalions. The regiment is the U.S. Army's premier raid force, with specialized skills that enable them to perform a variety of missions. These include direct action, airfield seizure, airborne and air assaults, special reconnaissance, personnel recovery, and high-value target raids. It operates as a special operations force under the United States Army Special Operations Command

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 11th Infantry Division was 'reformed' for a third time in 1944 as part of Operation Fortitude. A purely notional unit, in the deception it was depicted as intended to replace the real 4th Armored Division when the 4th Armored moved to Normandy. The division was presented to the Germans as a well trained unit based in the area around Northwich, Cheshire with its headquarters located at Delamere House. When the 4th Armored Division moved to Normandy, the 11th Infantry Division was depicted as moving into the vacated quarters around Bury St Edmunds. There, as part of the (notional) US XXXIII Corps of the (notional) US 14th Army it was depicted as assigned the role of following up the Pas de Calais landings. In the aftermath of Fortitude South II the 11th Division was depicted as moving to Winchester in Hampshire during August, 1944. The deception then had the 11th Division moving to Abergavenny in South Wales during October, 1944 when the deception was terminated by announcing that the 11th Division had been disbanded to provide replacements for other units. In the deception the 11th Infantry Division was composed of the notional 178th, 352nd, and 399th Infantry Regiments, in addition to notional artillery and support units.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

A combat engineer (also called field engineer, pioneer or sapper in many armies) is a soldier who performs a variety of construction and demolition tasks under combat conditions. The combat engineer's goals involve facilitating movement and support of friendly forces while impeding those of the enemy. Combat engineers build, repair and maintain buildings, roads and power supplies. They employ explosives for construction and demolition projects, and clear minefields using specialized vehicles. Such tasks typically include constructing and breaching trenches, tank traps and other fortifications, bunker construction, bridge and road construction or destruction, laying or clearing land mines, and other physical work in the battlefield. Typically, a combat engineer is also trained as an infantryman, and combat engineering units often have a secondary role fighting as infantry

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized)—nicknamed the "Red Diamond", the "Red Devils", or "die Roten Teufel"—was an infantry division of the United States Army that served in World War I, World War II and the Vietnam War, and with NATO and the U.S. Army III Corps. It was disbanded and deactivated on 24 November 1992.

Tags: agent-carter, we, lrsd, 75th, co

Tags: agent-carter, sqdrn, regt, regiment, squadron

Description

The 87th Infantry Division ("Golden Acorn") was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. The 87th Infantry Division arrived in Scotland, 22 October 1944, and trained in England, 23 October-30 November. It landed in France, 1–3 December, and moved to Metz, where, on 8 December, it went into action against and took Fort Driant. The division then shifted to the vicinity of Gross Rederching near the Saar-German border on 10 December and captured Rimling, Obergailbach, and Guiderkirch. The 87th was moving into Germany when, on 16 December 1944, German Field Marshal Von Rundstedt launched his offensive in the Ardennes forest (Battle of the Bulge). The Division was placed in SHAEF (Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force) reserve, 24–28 December, then thrown into the Bulge battle in Belgium, 29 December. In a fluctuating battle, it captured Moircy on 30 December and Remagne on 31 December. On 2 January 1945, it took Gérimont, on 10 January Tillet, and reached the Ourthe by the 13 January. On 15 January 1945, the division moved to Luxembourg to relieve the 4th Infantry Division along the Sauer and seized Wasserbillig on 23 January. The 87th moved to the vicinity of St. Vith, 28 January, and attacked and captured Schlierbach, Selz, and Hogden by the end of the month. After the fall of Neuendorf, 9 February, the division went on the defensive until 26 February, when Ormont and Hallschlag were taken in night attacks. The 87th crossed the Kyll River, 6 March, took Dollendorf on 8 March, and after a brief rest, returned to combat, 13 March 1945, crossing the Moselle on 16th and clearing Koblenz, 18–19 March. The division crossed the Rhine, 25–26 March, despite strong opposition, consolidated its bridgehead, and secured Grossenlinden and Langgöns. On 7 April, it jumped off in an attack which carried it through Thuringia into Saxony. Plauen fell, 17 April, and the division took up defensive positions, 20 April, about 4 miles from the border to Czechoslovakia. On 6 May 1945, it took Falkenstein and maintained its positions until Victory in Europe Day. The 87th Division returned to the States in July 1945 expecting to be called upon to play a role in the defeat of the Imperial Japanese, but the sudden termination of the war in the Pacific while the division was reassembling at Fort Benning changed the future of the 87th. The division was inactivated 21 September 1945. The last active soldier from the division retired in June 1981. Colonel Vedder B. Driscoll, who had enlisted in 1943 into Company "I", 345th Infantry, retired after 30 years of commissioned service.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

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