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The Battle of Khe Sanh was conducted in Khe Sanh of northwestern Quảng Trị Province, Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam), between 21 January and 9 July 1968 during the Vietnam War. The belligerent parties were elements of the United States III Marine Amphibious Force (III MAF), 1st Cavalry Division, the US Seventh Air Force, 1st Battalion 9th Marine Regiment, minor elements of the South Vietnamese Army (ARVN) against two to three division-size elements of the People's Army of Vietnam (generally referred to in Western sources as the North Vietnamese Army or NVA). The American command in Saigon initially believed that combat operations around the Khe Sanh Combat Base (KSCB) during the summer of 1967 were just part of a series of minor North Vietnamese offensives in the border regions. That appraisal was altered when it was discovered that the NVA was moving major forces into the area during the autumn and winter. A build-up of US Marine Corps forces took place and actions around Khe Sanh commenced when the Marine base was isolated. During a series of desperate actions that lasted 5 months and 18 days, Khe Sanh Combat Base and the hilltop outposts around it were under constant North Vietnamese ground, artillery, mortar, and rocket attacks. During the battle, a massive aerial bombardment campaign (Operation Niagara) was launched by the United States Air Force to support the Marine base. Over 100,000 tons of bombs were dropped until mid-April by aircraft of the Air Force, US Navy and Marines onto the area surrounding Khe Sanh. This was roughly 1,300 tons of bombs dropped daily–five tons for every one of the 20,000 NVA soldiers initially estimated to have been committed to the fighting at Khe Sanh. In addition, 158,000 large-caliber shells were fired on the hills surrounding the base. This expenditure of aerial munitions dwarfs the amount of munitions fired by artillery, which totals eight shells per NVA soldier believed to have been on the battlefield. The campaign used the latest technological advances in order to locate NVA forces for targeting. The logistical effort to support KSCB, once it was isolated overland, demanded the implementation of other tactical innovations in order to keep the Marines supplied.

Tags: agent-carter, nva, star, 6th, pers

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The Aleutian Islands Campaign was a military campaign conducted by the United States in the Aleutian Islands, part of the Alaska Territory, in the American theater and the Pacific theater of World War II starting on 3 June 1942. A small Japanese force occupied the islands of Attu and Kiska, where the remoteness of the islands and the challenges of weather and terrain delayed for nearly a year a larger U.S./Canadian force to eject them. The islands' strategic value was their ability to control Pacific transportation routes, which is why U.S. General Billy Mitchell stated to the U.S. Congress in 1935, "I believe that in the future, whoever holds Alaska will hold the world. I think it is the most important strategic place in the world." The Japanese reasoned that control of the Aleutians would prevent a possible U.S. attack across the Northern Pacific. Similarly, the U.S. feared that the islands would be used as bases from which to launch aerial assaults against the West Coast. A battle to reclaim Attu was launched on May 11, 1943 and completed following a final Japanese banzai charge on May 29. On 15 August 1943, an invasion force landed on Kiska in the wake of a sustained three-week barrage, only to discover that the Japanese had withdrawn from the island on July 29.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

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The Aleutian Islands Campaign was a military campaign conducted by the United States in the Aleutian Islands, part of the Alaska Territory, in the American theater and the Pacific theater of World War II starting on 3 June 1942. A small Japanese force occupied the islands of Attu and Kiska, where the remoteness of the islands and the challenges of weather and terrain delayed for nearly a year a larger U.S./Canadian force to eject them. The islands' strategic value was their ability to control Pacific transportation routes, which is why U.S. General Billy Mitchell stated to the U.S. Congress in 1935, "I believe that in the future, whoever holds Alaska will hold the world. I think it is the most important strategic place in the world." The Japanese reasoned that control of the Aleutians would prevent a possible U.S. attack across the Northern Pacific. Similarly, the U.S. feared that the islands would be used as bases from which to launch aerial assaults against the West Coast. A battle to reclaim Attu was launched on May 11, 1943 and completed following a final Japanese banzai charge on May 29. On 15 August 1943, an invasion force landed on Kiska in the wake of a sustained three-week barrage, only to discover that the Japanese had withdrawn from the island on July 29. The campaign is known as the "Forgotten Battle", due to its being overshadowed by the simultaneous Guadalcanal Campaign. In the past, many Western military historians believed it was a diversionary or feint attack during the Battle of Midway, meant to draw out the U.S. Pacific Fleet from Midway Atoll, as it was launched simultaneously under the same commander, Isoroku Yamamoto.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

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The Air Defense Artillery branch of the US Army specializes in anti-aircraft weapons (such as surface to air missiles). In the US Army, these groups are composed of mainly air defense systems such as the Patriot Missile System, Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD), and the Avenger Air Defense system which fires the FIM-92 Stinger missile. The Air Defense Artillery branch descended from Anti-Aircraft Artillery (part of the U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps until 1950, then part of the Artillery Branch) into a separate branch on 20 June 1968. On 1 December 1968, the ADA branch was authorized to wear modified Artillery insignia, crossed field guns with missile.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The US Army is rushing to stand up cyber forces but its progress shows both how far we’ve come, and how far we have to go. “From an initial start of six officers in 2014… today we have 397 officers, 141 warrant officers, and 560 non-commissioned officers and soldiers” in the Army’s recently created cyber branch, the four-star Vice Chief of Staff, Gen. Daniel Allyn, told an Association of the US Army conference last week. That’s just over 1,000 specialists of all ranks. (Another 962 soldiers are in the related field of electronic warfare).

Tags: agent-carter, will, diamond, p, personnel

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The 92nd Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army that served in both World War I and World War II. Organized in October 1917 at Camp Funston, Kansas, the unit was formed with African American soldiers from all states. Before leaving for France in 1918, the buffalo was selected as the divisional insignia due to the "Buffalo Soldiers" nickname, given to African American cavalrymen by Native Americans in the 19th century. The "Buffalo Soldiers Division" divisional nickname was inherited from the 367th Infantry, one of the first units of the division organized. This segregated unit was the only African American infantry division to see combat in Europe during World War II, as part of the U.S. Fifth Army, fighting in the Italian Campaign. It served in the Italian Campaign from 1944 to the war's end.

Tags: combat, parachute, paratrooper, rgr, ranger

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The 75th Infantry Regiment (Ranger) (officially 75th Infantry Regiment or 75th Infantry) was initially a parent regiment for all the US Army Ranger units during the Vietnam War and the early 1980s and then the headquarters for the Ranger battalions.

Tags: 1st-bn-75th-infantry-regiment-ranger-branch-wo-txt, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

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The Bell AH-1 Cobra is a two-blade, single engine attack helicopter manufactured by Bell Helicopter. It was developed using the engine, transmission and rotor system of the Bell UH-1 Iroquois. A member of the prolific Huey family, the AH-1 is also referred to as the HueyCobra or Snake. The AH-1 was the backbone of the United States Army's attack helicopter fleet, but has been replaced by the AH-64 Apache in Army service. Upgraded versions continue to fly with the militaries of several other nations. The AH-1 twin engine versions remain in service with United States Marine Corps (USMC) as the service's primary attack helicopter.

Tags: vietnam-vcm-ah-1-cobra, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

When the 1st Infantry Division deployed to Vietnam in 1965, additional manoeuvre battalions were required; thus two infantry battalions from the 2nd Brigade, 5th Infantry Division, at Fort Devens, Massachusetts, were relieved and assigned to "The Big Red One." In September 1965, the 2nd Brigade, 5th Infantry Division was moved, minus personnel, to Fort Carson, Colorado, and refilled there. The remaining personnel at Fort Devens formed the basis of the 196th Infantry Brigade. By 1968 the division was stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado, as a mechanized formation. 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division was dispatched to Vietnam af

Tags: vietnam-5th-id-lrrp, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

The 47th Infantry Division was a formation of the United States Army active from 1946 to 1991. It was provided by the Army National Guard. The division was created on 10 June 1946 as a National Guard infantry division from the efforts of Minnesota's Adjutant General Ellard Walsh. The division was built from scratch with veteran transfers and new recruits, mostly from Minnesota and North Dakota, under the command of Major General Norman Hendrickson. General Hendrickson was the Chief-of-Staff for the 34th Division in the North African and Italian campaigns in 1943 and the IX Corps in occupied Japan. The 47th Infantry Division remained on the rolls longer than any other National Guard division that did not see combat (45 years of service). The only Army division that did not see combat to have remained on the rolls longer is the Army Reserve's 108th Infantry Division, elements of which have seen action now in Iraq and Afghanistan

Tags: 47th, ironfist, 46th, thunderbird, 45th

Description

Recondo is an American military term for RECONnaissance and commanDO for highly specialized infantry training or a graduate of a Recondo School who led small, heavily armed long-range reconnaissance teams that patrol deep in enemy-held territory

Tags: 36th, viking, 47th, ironfist, 46th

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The 36th Infantry Division ("Arrowhead"), also known as the "Texas Division", is an infantry division of the United States Army, part of the Texas Army National Guard. It was organized at the (former) Camp Bowie (Fort Worth), Texas, 18 July 1917, from units of the Texas and Oklahoma National Guard during World War I. It was activated for service for World War II on 25 November 1940, and was sent to the European Theater of Operations in April 1943, and returned to the Texas Army National Guard in December 1945. A unit of the 36th Infantry, the 2nd Battalion, 131st Field Artillery, was detached and sent to the Pacific just before the outbreak of war in late 1941. Captured by the Japanese and forced into slave labor, its fate was unknown for most of the rest of World War II, resulting in the name of The Lost Battalion. The 36th Infantry Division was reconstituted in a May 2004 reorganization of the 49th Armored Division.

Tags: 36th-infantry-division-arrowhead-division, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

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The 18th Infantry Regiment ("Vanguards") is an Army Infantry regiment. The 18th Infantry Regiment currently exists with one active battalion under the U.S. Army Regimental System and has no regimental headquarters. 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment's home duty station is located at Fort Riley, Kansas with the 2d "Dagger" Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division. It is a combined arms battalion. 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment was stationed in Baumholder, Germany as part of the 170th infantry Brigade Combat Team (Separate) and inactivated with the brigade in 2012. 3d Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment was stationed in Lawrence, Massachusetts as part of the 187th Infantry Brigade, 94th Army Reserve Command (1963–1994). 4th Battalion, 18th Infantry was part of the Berlin Brigade stationed in West Berlin in the 1960s along with the 2d and 3d Battalions, 6th Infantry. West Berlin was 100 miles behind the Iron Curtain in East Germany surrounded by an estimated force of 270,000 Russian and East German troops. The battalion was later reflagged as the 4th Battalion, 6th Infantry.

Tags: 1st-battalion-18th-infantry-wo-txt, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

The US Army currently employs six types of infantry: light infantry (consisting of four sub-types), "Stryker infantry", and mechanized infantry. The infantrymen themselves are essentially trained, organized, armed, and equipped the same, save for some having airborne, air assault, and/or Ranger qualification(s), the primary difference being in the organic vehicles (or lack thereof) assigned to the infantry unit, or the notional delivery method (i.e., parachute drop or heliborne) employed to place the infantryman on the battlefield. All modern US Army rifle platoons contain three nine-man rifle squads, with each type of infantry having a discrete TO&E.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Army - Infantry Laptop Case

by twix123844
$36
Description

The 45th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army, part of the Oklahoma Army National Guard, from 1920 to 1968. Headquartered mostly in Oklahoma City, the guardsmen fought in both World War II and the Korean War. They trace their lineage from frontier militias that operated in the Southwestern United States throughout the late 1800s

Tags: 45th, things, all, in, prepared

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On 16 February 1996, the 1st Battalion, 1st Aviation was reactivated and restationed at Katterbach, Germany, as part of 4th Brigade (Aviation), 1st Infantry Division. On 24 December 1996, the 1st Battalion, 1st Aviation was alerted and deployed to the former Republic of Yugoslavia to conduct operations as part of the North Atlantic Treaty Organizations (NATO) Stabilization Force (SFOR) Operational Reserve. On 31 October 1997, the 1st Battalion, 1st Aviation returned to Katterbach, Germany, where the unit provided invaluable reconnaissance and lethal attack helicopter fires for the soldiers of the Big Red One. Currently the regiment may have up to three battalions.

Tags: 1st-aviation-battalion, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

On 1 July 1968, at Camp Eagle in the Republic of Vietnam, the 160th Aviation Group was constituted with elements of the 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment; the 101st Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter); the 158th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter); and the 159th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter). Less than a year later, on 25 June 1969, the 160th Aviation Group was redesignated as the 101st Aviation Group

Tags: 1st-aviation-battaliondivisional, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

The 36th Armored Infantry was formed on 1 July 1916 at Brownsville, Texas from elements of the 4th Infantry, 26th Infantry and 28th Infantry. It was assigned to the 12th Division on 5 July 1918, relieved from the 12th Division 31 January 1919, and inactivated at Fort Jay New York on 13 October 1921. The 36th was reassigned to the Ninth Infantry Division on 24 March 1923 and relieved from the Ninth Infantry Division on 1 August 1940. It was redesignated the 36th Infantry (Armored) on 15 April 1941 and reassigned to the Third Armored Division. On 1 July 1942 it was redesignated the 36th Armored Infantry Regiment. The regiment's first commander was Walton Walker.

Tags: 36th-infantry-regiment-deeds-not-words, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

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Vietnam: Defense; Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase II; Counteroffensive, Phase III; Tet Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase IV; Counteroffensive, Phase V; Counteroffensive, Phase VI; Tet 69/Counteroffensive; Summer-Fall 1969; Winter-Spring 1970

Tags: 1st-battalion-18th-infantry-w-svc, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

The 47th Infantry Division remained on the rolls longer than any other National Guard division that did not see combat (45 years of service). The 47th Infantry Division was a formation of the United States Army active from 1946 to 1991. It was provided by the Army National Guard. The division was created on 10 June 1946 as a National Guard infantry division from the efforts of Minnesota's Adjutant General Ellard Walsh. The division was built from scratch with veteran transfers and new recruits, mostly from Minnesota and North Dakota, under the command of Major General Norman Hendrickson. General Hendrickson was the Chief-of-Staff for the 34th Division in the North African and Italian campaigns in 1943 and the IX Corps in occupied Japan.. The only Army division that did not see combat to have remained on the rolls longer is the Army Reserve's 108th Infantry Division, elements of which have seen action now in Iraq and Afghanistan

Tags: 47th, ironfist, 46th, thunderbird, 45th

Description

On 14 January 1966, the 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, was relieved from assignment to the 171st Infantry Brigade and assigned to the 25th Infantry Division "Tropic Lightning" at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. A month earlier these Manchus had been in Alaska preparing for annual winter maneuvers to be conducted in temperatures of 50 below zero. Eight weeks later the battalion was preparing for deployment to the heat and humidity of South Vietnam. On 29 April, the battalion disembarked the ship General Walker at Vũng Tàu, Vietnam. Within hours of their arrival they found themselves under fire as their convoy made its way to the 25th Division's Củ Chi Base Camp. The next day, a little more than 24 hours after arriving in country, Alpha company engaged the enemy in a firefight – setting the tone of regular contact that would characterize the Manchu experience for the next four and a half years. Many operations were conducted by company-sized or smaller units but there were also notable larger scale operations in which the entire battalion took part. They included Asheville, Wahiawa, Joliet I and II, Helemano, and Kahana I and II.

Tags: uh-1-9th-infantry-front-oblique-vietnam-w-vn-svc-medals, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

"In remembrance of those killed while serving with the 1st Battalion, 50th United States Infantry Regiment during the War in Vietnam. 1967-1970. May God have mercy on their souls and grant them peace."

Tags: 50th, 49ers, 49th, recondo, viking

Description

The 47th Infantry Division was a formation of the United States Army active from 1946 to 1991. It was provided by the Army National Guard. The division was created on 10 June 1946 as a National Guard infantry division from the efforts of Minnesota's Adjutant General Ellard Walsh. The division was built from scratch with veteran transfers and new recruits, mostly from Minnesota and North Dakota, under the command of Major General Norman Hendrickson. General Hendrickson was the Chief-of-Staff for the 34th Division in the North African and Italian campaigns in 1943 and the IX Corps in occupied Japan. The 47th Infantry Division remained on the rolls longer than any other National Guard division that did not see combat (45 years of service). The only Army division that did not see combat to have remained on the rolls longer is the Army Reserve's 108th Infantry Division, elements of which have seen action now in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Tags: 47th, ironfist, 46th, thunderbird, 45th

Description

On 1 July 1968, at Camp Eagle in the Republic of Vietnam, the 160th Aviation Group was constituted with elements of the 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment; the 101st Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter); the 158th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter); and the 159th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter). Less than a year later, on 25 June 1969, the 160th Aviation Group was redesignated as the 101st Aviation Group

Tags: 1st-aviation-battaliondivisional-with-svc-ribbon, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

On 12 July 1965 the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 2nd Infantry were relieved from assignment to the 5th Infantry Division and assigned to the 1st Infantry Division with no change of station and in September 1965 the two battalions deployed to Vietnam, landing on the beach at Vũng Tàu in October 1965. From there they proceeded to their assigned areas, Phước Vĩnh for the 1st Battalion and Lai Khe for the 2nd Battalion. The battalions initially fought as light infantry in the areas north and west of Saigon. On 2 January 1967 the 2nd Battalion officially became a mechanized infantry battalion. The 2nd Battalion fought the first major battles at Ap Bau Bang on 12 November 1965 and Ap Nha Mat on 5 December 1965. Heavy losses were suffered at Ap Nha Mat and three soldiers are still listed as missing. The 1st Battalion sustained its first major casualties of the war on 21 December 1965 when the enemy ambushed the command group of Company B as the company was moving out of Bien Hoa on routine patrol. On 25 August 1966 a patrol from Company C, 1st Battalion became involved in what became known as the Battle of Bong Trang with heavy losses on both sides. During four and a half years the battalions were involved in major operations such as: Junction City, the largest operation conducted up to that time, Lam Son II, Paul Bunyan, Bu Dop, AKA, Battle of Hill 172, An Lộc, and An Lộc II, and numerous other operations and small unit actions. Contact with the enemy was almost daily. When the 1st Infantry Division stood down in March and April 1970 the 1st and 2nd Battalion's colors were cased and the soldiers were either reassigned to other units in Vietnam or returned to the United States to be discharged.

Tags: 1st-battalion-2nd-infantry, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

The 49th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army formed from the 52nd Infantry Division. The 52nd Infantry Division was activated on 15 August 1946, and was allocated to the State of California as a National Guard division during the post World War II demobilization. The division was to be headquartered in the area of "49'ers" of the California Gold Rush. To mark the upcoming centenary of the 1849 gold rush, the State of California requested that the 52d Infantry Division change its designation to the 49th Infantry Division. The change was approved by a National Guard Bureau Letter, CSNGB, dated 24 October 1947, Subject: "Change in Designation of 52d Infantry Division" and an Adjutant General Letter, AGAO-I 325 dated 20 October 1947, Subject: "Allotment of National Guard Units (California)." The change was made retroactive to 5 August 1946, the formation of the original 52nd division. The new division was known as the "Argonaut Division," and its shoulder sleeve insignia depicted a 49'er panning for gold. The nickname refers to the 49'ers, who were also known as Argonauts. The 49th Infantry Division was inactivated on 29 January 1968.

Tags: 49th, recondo, viking, 47th, ironfist

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The 43rd Infantry Division was a formation of the United States Army from 1925 to 1967, serving in the Pacific during World War II. It was activated on 21 March 1925 as a National Guard Division in Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The 143rd Area Support Group of the Connecticut National Guard now carries on the heritage.

Tags: winged, 43rd, rainbow, 42nd, 41st

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The 37th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. It was a National Guard division from Ohio, nicknamed the "Buckeye Division". Today, its lineage is continued through the 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, with battalions from both Ohio and Michigan

Tags: 37th-infantry-division-buckeye-division, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

The Iroquois was originally designated HU-1, hence the Huey nickname, which has remained in common use, despite the official redesignation to UH-1 in 1962. The UH-1 first saw service in combat operations during the Vietnam War, with around 7,000 helicopters deployed.

Tags: uh-1-front-oblique-vietnam-slick-w-vn-svc-medals, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

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The 46th Infantry Division was a formation of the Michigan Army National Guard active between 1947 and 1968. It was initially headquartered at Lansing. Many of its units had previously been part of the 32nd Infantry Division. It was converted to the Reorganization Objective Army Division (ROAD) structure in March 1963. The Division's 2nd Brigade was assigned to the Selected Reserve Force, a higher-readiness component of the ARNG, in 1965.[1] Virtually the entire division was involved in responding to the 12th Street riot in Detroit in July–August 1967. The 1968 reductions of the Army National Guard, initiated by Defense Secretary Robert McNamara who felt that fifteen divisions were too many, reduced the division to the 46th Infantry Brigade, which was allocated to the 38th Infantry Division. In 1985 the Brigade, headquartered at Wyoming, Michigan, consisted of the 1–125 Infantry Regiment, the 3-126 Infantry, and the 1–225 Infantry Regiment

Tags: 46th, thunderbird, 45th, things, all

Description

The 44th Infantry Division was a division of the United States Army National Guard from October 1920 to November 1945, when it was inactivated after Federal Service during World War II. A second 44th Infantry Division existed in the Illinois Army National Guard from 1946 until October 1954, when that division was disbanded after federal service during the Korean War.

Tags: all, in, prepared, 44th, victory

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The 36th Infantry Division ("Arrowhead"), also known as the "Texas Division", is an infantry division of the United States Army, part of the Texas Army National Guard. It was organized at the (former) Camp Bowie (Fort Worth), Texas, 18 July 1917, from units of the Texas and Oklahoma National Guard during World War I. It was activated for service for World War II on 25 November 1940, and was sent to the European Theater of Operations in April 1943, and returned to the Texas Army National Guard in December 1945. A unit of the 36th Infantry, the 2nd Battalion, 131st Field Artillery, was detached and sent to the Pacific just before the outbreak of war in late 1941. Captured by the Japanese and forced into slave labor, its fate was unknown for most of the rest of World War II, resulting in the name of The Lost Battalion. The 36th Infantry Division was reconstituted in a May 2004 reorganization of the 49th Armored Division.

Tags: 36th-airborne-division-arrowhead, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

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The 38th Infantry Division ("Cyclone") is one of the eighteen divisions of the United States Army, and one of eight National Guard divisions. It is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, and contains Army National Guard units from Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Delaware, Michigan and Tennessee. Formed in 1917, the division earned the special designation “Cyclone Division” after the division’s training camp at Camp Shelby, Mississippi was damaged by a springtime tornado. Deployed to France in the closing days of the Great War, the 38th Division was broken up to provide fillers for combat formations. At the end of the war, the 38th Division demobilized and after a brief period of inactivity, was reconstituted and reorganized in the National Guard on 16 March 1923.

Tags: 38th-infantry-division-cyclone-division, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

On 1 July 1968, at Camp Eagle in the Republic of Vietnam, the 160th Aviation Group was constituted with elements of the 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment; the 101st Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter); the 158th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter); and the 159th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter). Less than a year later, on 25 June 1969, the 160th Aviation Group was redesignated as the 101st Aviation Group

Tags: 1st-aviation-battaliondivisional-w-txt, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

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Description

Vietnam: Defense; Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase II; Counteroffensive, Phase III; Tet Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase IV; Counteroffensive, Phase V; Counteroffensive, Phase VI; Tet 69/Counteroffensive; Summer-Fall 1969; Winter-Spring 1970

Tags: 1st-battalion-18th-infantry-w-txt, military, insignia, crest, distinctive

Description

Mechanized infantry is infantry equipped with armored personnel carriers (APCs) or infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) for transport and combat (see also mechanized force). Mechanized infantry is distinguished from motorized infantry in that its vehicles provide a degree of protection from hostile fire, as opposed to "soft-skinned" wheeled vehicles (trucks or jeeps) for motorized infantry. Most APCs and IFVs are fully tracked or are all-wheel drive vehicles (6×6 or 8×8), for mobility across rough ground. Some nations distinguish between mechanized and armored infantry, designating troops carried by APCs as mechanized and those in IFVs as armored. The support weapons for mechanized infantry are also provided with motorized transport, or they are built directly into combat vehicles to keep pace with the mechanized infantry in combat. For units equipped with most types of APC or any type of IFV, fire support weapons, such as machine guns, autocannons, small-bore direct-fire howitzers, and even anti-tank guided missiles are often mounted directly on the infantry's own transport vehicles. Compared with "light" truck-mobile infantry, mechanized infantry can maintain rapid tactical movement and, if mounted in IFVs, has more integral firepower. It requires more combat supplies (ammunition and especially fuel) and ordnance supplies (spare vehicle components), and a comparatively larger proportion of manpower is required to crew and maintain the vehicles. For example, most APCs mount a section of seven or eight infantrymen but have a crew of two. Most IFVs carry only six or seven infantry but require a crew of three. To be effective in the field, mechanized units also require many mechanics, with specialized maintenance and recovery vehicles and equipment.

Tags: agent-carter, vn, vietnam, war, nam

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