Each purchase supports an independent artist.

Sort By:

Usaaf Laptop Cases

Description

Shoulder patch for the US Army Air Force, 1941-1947.

Tags: usaaf, aaf, us, usa, army-air-force

USAAF Patch Laptop Case

by Ekliptik
$36
Description

United States Army Air Force roundel, in use from 1919-1941.

Tags: usaaf, aaf, air-force, us-air-force, wwii

USAAF Roundel Laptop Case

by Ekliptik
$36
Description

The Fifth Air Force (5 AF) is a numbered air force of the United States Air Force Pacific Air Forces (PACAF). It is headquartered at Yokota Air Base, Japan. It is the U.S. Air Force's oldest continuously serving Numbered Air Force. The organization has provided 70 years of continuous air power to the Pacific since its establishment in September 1941. Fifth Air Force is the Headquarters Pacific Air Forces forward element in Japan, and maximizes partnership capabilities and promotes bilateral defense cooperation. In addition, 5 AF is the air component to United States Forces Japan

Tags: iraq, iraqi, operation, patch, div

Description

A July 1941 attempt at establishing a bombardier school at Lowry Field, Colorado. 3 instructor classes with the last graduating 14 March 1941, was replaced by schools at Barksdale Field, Louisiana (moved to Albuquerque) and Ellington Field, Texas to a navigator school.) In June 1942, several classes of cadets were sent for bombardier training at Davis-Monthan Field, Arizona. Bombardier schools of the Gulf Coast Air Corps Training Center and the West Coast Air Corps Training Center included the GCACTC's Big Spring Army Air Force Bombardier School. Its "first class of cadets (118 men) arrived Sept. 16, 1942". The first bombardier training class (42-17) at San Angelo Army Airfield began in September 1942, and San Angelo's 34th Flying Training Wing (Bombardier and Specialized Twin- and Four-Engine) activated on January 8, 1943, as one of two dedicated bombardier training wings. The other was WCACTC's 38th Flying Training Wing at Williams Army Airfield, Arizona—later moved to Kirtland Field, New Mexico).

Tags: bomber, patch, insignia, military, school

Description

The 365th Fighter-Bomber Group, otherwise known as the Hell Hawks, was activated May 15, 1943 and assigned to fly P-47 Thunderbolts. They trained in Dover, Delaware and flew their gunnery training missions out of Millville, New Jersey. They departed Richmond Army Air Base in December 4, 1943 and sailed on the Queen Elizabeth along with 15,000 troops. They arrived at Gosfield, Essex on December 23, 1943. Their first combat air field training resumed for two months. On February 22, 1944, the Hell Hawks flew their first combat mission and over the next one to two months gradually converted from escorting 8th Air Force heavy bombers to their fighter-bomber mode that continued to the war's end.

Tags: hawks, hell, usaaf, aac, corps

365th FG - 9th AF Laptop Case

by twix123844
$36
Description

A July 1941 attempt at establishing a bombardier school at Lowry Field, Colorado. 3 instructor classes with the last graduating 14 March 1941, was replaced by schools at Barksdale Field, Louisiana (moved to Albuquerque) and Ellington Field, Texas to a navigator school.) In June 1942, several classes of cadets were sent for bombardier training at Davis-Monthan Field, Arizona. Bombardier schools of the Gulf Coast Air Corps Training Center and the West Coast Air Corps Training Center included the GCACTC's Big Spring Army Air Force Bombardier School. Its "first class of cadets (118 men) arrived Sept. 16, 1942". The first bombardier training class (42-17) at San Angelo Army Airfield began in September 1942, and San Angelo's 34th Flying Training Wing (Bombardier and Specialized Twin- and Four-Engine) activated on January 8, 1943, as one of two dedicated bombardier training wings. The other was WCACTC's 38th Flying Training Wing at Williams Army Airfield, Arizona—later moved to Kirtland Field, New Mexico).

Tags: bombardier, school, us, army, air

Tags: bomb, wwii, lockheed, bombadier, veteran

Description

he 448th Bomb Group was a B-24 Liberator Group that flew out of Seething, Norfolk. The Group flew their first mission on the 22nd December 1943 and over the next eighteen months the air crews flew 262 missions over occupied Europe.

Tags: army, states, united, us, corps

Description

The 479th Bombardment Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last was assigned to the 336th Bombardment Group, stationed at Lake Charles Army Air Field, Louisiana. It was inactivated on 1 May 1944.

Tags: force, retired, wwii, veteran, vet

Description

Established as at B-24 Liberator heavy bomber replacement training unit. Converted in September 1943 for operational training; assigned to Second Air Force for training. Deployed to Mediterranean Theater of Operations (MTO) in December 1943, squadron taking the South Atlantic Transport Route though the Caribbean and South America; transiting the Atlantic Ocean via Brazil and Dakar, French West Africa, being assigned to Fifteenth Air Force in January 1944 at Grottaglie Airfield in Southern Italy.

Tags: 15th, group, 449th, bs, bombardment

Description

The Tuskegee Airmen is the popular name of a group of African-American military pilots (fighter and bomber) who fought in World War II. Officially, they formed the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the United States Army Air Forces. The name also applies to the navigators, bombardiers, mechanics, instructors, crew chiefs, nurses, cooks and other support personnel for the pilots.

Tags: bg, fs, squadron, fighter, 332nd

Tuskegee Airmen Laptop Case

by twix123844
$36
Description

The 427th Bombardment Squadron was originally the 38th Reconnaissance Squadron. They were sailing to Hawaii to join its parent, the 19th Bomb Group, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on the 7th of December 1941. The ship carrying the 38th Reconnaissance Squadron returned to the mainland and the personnel were assigned to the 427th Bomb Squadron. The 427th BS became famous with its parent, the 303rd Bombardment Group (H). Because of its initial move in the Pacific, 427th Squadron members are entitled to we ar the Asia-Pacific Campaign ribbon.

Tags: patch, insignia, military, aircraft, liberator

Description

During World War II, the 398th Bombardment Group (Heavy) was an Eighth Air Force B-17 Flying Fortress unit in England, stationed at RAF Nuthampstead. The group flew 195 combat missions, the last being on 25 April 1945.

Tags: veteran, vet, insignia, military, usaaf

Description

Military On the Wiki Wiki Activity Random page Videos Images Chat Forum Maps Popular pages Community Contribute Watchlist Random page Recent changes 531st Bombardment Squadron 200,812pages on this wiki Edit Comments0 531st Bombardment Squadron 531st Bombardment Squadron - Emblem Emblem of the 531st Bombardment Squadron Country United States Branch United States Air Force Service history Active 1942-1962 2010 Role Bomber Part of United States Air Force/Strategic Air Command Battles World War II Korean war Commanders Insignia It was last assigned to the 380th Bombardment Wing, based at Plattsburgh AFB, New York. It was inactivated on 1 January 1962. Contents[show] HistoryEdit Established in late 1942 as a B-24 Liberator heavy bomb squadron; trained under Second Air Force in Texas, and later in Colorado. Deployed to the Southwest Pacific Area (SPA) in April 1943, being assigned to Fifth Air Force in Australia. From airfields in Australia, the squadron reached out to the Japanese installations in the Netherlands East Indies. Moved to the Philippines where the squadron operated in early 1945, then to Okinawa where combat operations ended after the Japanese Capitulation in August. After the war, squadron personnel were demobilized and returned to the United States, the B-24s sent to reclamation in the Philippines. Inactivated as a paper unit in early 1946.

Tags: b-47, fifth, 5th, medium, heavy

Description

the 6th Bomb Group and to those who supported them in the field and at home. The Group was based on the island of Tinian during WWII and participated in the war effort against Japan during 1944-45. The Group, was part of the 313th Bomb Wing, 20th Air Force. Along with other groups based on Tinian, Saipan and Guam, they were responsible for the bombing campaign that finally brought an end to the war. Although many lives were lost - on both sides - these efforts saved the millions of lives that would have been lost in an invasion of the mainland.

Tags: eagle, wimgs-the, of, republic, arvn

Description

The 61st Fighter Squadron was constituted as the 61st Pursuit Squadron as part of the 56th Pursuit Group at Savannah, Georgia, on 15 January 1941. The squadron immediately began training for its wartime missions under III Fighter Command, rapidly transitioning through the Seversky P-35, Curtiss P-36 Hawk, Bell P-39 Airacobra and Curtiss P-40 Warhawk aircraft. On 7 December 1941, the 61st stepped up to defend the Southeastern United States from anticipated enemy air attack while it converted to the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft and prepared to deploy overseas. In November 1942, P-47 Thunderbolt dive test pilots achieved 725 mph, faster than the speed of sound. The 61st Fighter Squadron is an active United States Air Force unit, assigned to the 56th Operations Group, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. It operates the F-35 Lightning II aircraft, conducting Instructor Pilot training. The 61st, known as the 'Top Dogs', fly F-35A aircraft, to train instructor pilots and initial qualification pilots for Air Combat Command assignments.

Tags: states, air-corps, aaf, united, usaaf

Description

The 65th Bombardment Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 72d Strategic Wing (Provisional), based at Andersen AFB, Guam. It was inactivated on 15 November 1973. Established in 1940 and activated in 1941 as a bomber squadron, assigned to the GHQ Air Force Northeast Air District. Trained and was equipped with both early model B-17C/D Flying Fortress heavy bombers and B-18 Bolo medium bombers at Langley Field, and flew training missions over the Mid-Atlantic States. After the Pearl Harbor Attack, was deployed to New England and began flying antisubmarine missions from Bangor Airport over the Newfoundland Straits and performing aerial convoy patrols over the North Atlantic shipping lanes. Deployed to Australia in February 1942, being assigned to the new Fifth Air Force being formed after the withdraw from the Philippines of remaining heavy bombers. The squadron reached Australia in March 1942, but did not enter combat until September, when it finally had a reasonable complement of aircraft. From then until November 1944 the squadron operated in support of the campaign in Papua New Guinea, first from Australia, then from New Guinea and Owi Island, concentrated in particular in attacks on shipping. The unit experimented with low level skip bombing, using this tactic at the Battle of the Bismarck Sea, 2–4 March 1943 with some success.

Tags: 43rd, bomb, group, bomber, bombardment

Description

Moved to the Southwest Pacific, via Capetown, Feb-Mar 1942. Became part of Fifth AF. Equipped first with B-17's, but converted to B-24's, May-Sep 1943. Operated from Australia, New Guinea, and Owi Island, Aug 1941-Nov 1944, making numerous attacks on Japanese shipping in the Netherlands East Indies and the Bismarck Archipelago. Experimented with skip bombing and used this method for some shipping strikes, including attacks on Japanese vessels during the Battle of the Bismarck Sea, 2-4 Mar 1943; received a DUC for participation in this latter action in which repeated air attacks destroyed a large enemy convoy carrying reinforcements to New Guinea. Other operations during this period included support for ground forces on New Guinea; attacks on airfields and installations in New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, Celebes, Halmahera, Yap, Palau, and the southern Philippines; and long-range raids against oil refineries on Ceram and Borneo. Capt Jay Zeamer Jr, pilot, and 2nd Lt Joseph R Sarnoski, bombardier, each won the Medal of Honor for action during a photographic mapping mission over the Solomon Islands on 16 Jun 1943: when the mission was nearly completed, their aircraft was assaulted by about 20 interceptors; although painfully wounded, Lt Sarnoski remained at the nose guns and fired at the enemy until he died at his post; sustaining severe injuries, Capt Zeamer maneuvered the plane until the enemy had broken combat, then directed the flight to a base more than 500 miles away. After moving to the Philippines in Nov 1944, the group atttacked shipping along the Asiatic coast; struck industries, airfields, and installations in China and Formosa; and supported ground forces on Luzon. Moved to Ie Shima in Jul 1945 and conducted missions against airfields and railways in Japan and against shipping in the Inland Sea and the Sea of Japan. Returned to the Philippines in in Dec 1945. Inactivated on 29 Apr 1946.

Tags: af, bs, bg, sw, southwest

Description

Transferred to III Fighter Command in June 1943, began training for deployment to the European Theater of Operations (ETO) as a P-47 Thunderbolt fighter-bomber squadron. Deployed to England in April 1944 as part of IX Fighter Command. Initial missions included strafing and dive-bombing armored vehicles, trains, bridges, buildings, factories, troop concentrations, gun emplacements, airfields, and other targets in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. The squadron also flew some escort missions with Eighth Air Force Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress and Consolidated B-24 Liberator strategic bombers. On D-Day the squadron patrolled the air over the landing zones and by flying close-support and interdiction missions. Moved to its Advanced Landing Ground at Brucheville, France (A-16) in July, then eastward as ground forces advanced on the continent. Operations supported the breakthrough at Saint-Lô in July and the thrust of U.S. Third Army toward Germany in August and September as part of the 303d Fighter Wing, XIX Tactical Air Command. In October, the squadron moved into Belgium to support U.S. Ninth Army. Participated in the Battle of the Bulge during December 1944 and January 1945 by flying armed reconnaissance and close-support missions. Aided U.S. First Army's push across the Roer River in February 1945. Supported operations at the Remagen bridgehead and during the airborne assault across the Rhine in March. By V-E Day, the squadron was based at Kassel/Rothwesten airfield, Germany (ALG R-12), where it remained until February 1946 as part of the United States Air Forces in Europe Army of Occupation. In February, the unit was transferred, without personnel or equipment to Bolling Field, Washington, D.C where it was inactivated as a paper unit.

Tags: wimgs-the, 53rd, fighter, squadron, fs

close
or

Username will also be used as your store name.

or