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56th Baseball T-Shirts

Description

The 81st Infantry Division ("Wildcat") was an infantry division of the United States Army that was mobilized for service in both World War I and World War II. The division was inactivated in 1965 and remains on the inactive list of the United States Army. The 81st Infantry Division landed in Hawaii, 11 June-8 July 1944. The division minus Regimental Combat Team (RCT) 323 invaded Angaur Island in the Palau group, as part of the Palau Islands campaign 17 September, and pushed through to the western shore in a quick movement, cutting the island in half. The enemy was driven into isolated pockets and mopping-up operations began on 20 September. RCT 321, attached to the 1st Marine Division, went into action on Peleliu Island in the Palaus and assisted in splitting defense forces and isolating them in mountainous areas in the central part of the island. The team aided in mopping up Ngesebus Island and capturing Kongauru and Garakayo Islands. RCT 323 under naval task force command occupied the Ulithi atoll, 21–23 September 1944. Elements of the team landed on Ngulu Atoll and destroyed enemy personnel and installations, 16 October, completing the outflanking of the enemy base at Yap. On 18 October, RCT 323 left to rejoin the 81st on Peleliu, which assumed command of all troops on that island and Angaur, 20 October 1944. Resistance was ended on Peleliu, 27 November. Between 4 November 1944 and 1 January 1945, the division seized Pulo Anna Island, Kyangel Atoll, and Pais Island. The 81st left in increments from 1 January to 8 February for New Caledonia for rehabilitation and training. The division arrived in Leyte on 17 May 1945, and after a period of training participated in mopping-up operations in the northwest part of the island, 21 July 1945 to 12 August 1945. After rest and training, the 81st moved to Japan, 18 September, and performed occupation duties in Aomori Prefecture until inactivation.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 88th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army that saw service in both World War I and World War II. It was one of the first of the Organized Reserve divisions to be reactivated, created nearly "from scratch" after the implementation of the draft in 1940. Previous divisions were composed of either Regular Army or National Guard personnel. Much of the experience in reactivating it was used in the subsequent expansion of the U.S. Army. By the end of World War II the 88th Infantry fought its way to the northernmost extreme of Italy. In early May 1945 troops of its 349th Infantry Regiment joined the 103d Infantry Division of the VI Corps of the U.S. Seventh Army, part of the 6th Army Group, which had raced south through Bavaria into Innsbruck, Austria, in Vipiteno in the Italian Alps.[1] According to the National WWII Museum, the title "Blue Devils" was not attributed to the unit until a later deployment in WWII. Originally, the unit was known as the "Clover Leaf Battalion" but later became known as the "Fighting Blue Devils". This name was taken from German propaganda, which was shouted over speakers with the intentions of demoralizing U.S. troops. Instead the unit took the name "Blue Devils", which was intended to be an insult which called them deceptive and ruthless, to their liking and chose to rename their unit.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

56th Street Records logo in Black ink yo.

Tags: weed, 56th-street-records, 56th-street, hotrock, supajoint

Description

The Army Nurse Corps stopped being all-female in 1955; that year Edward L.T. Lyon was the first man to receive a commission in the Army Nurse Corps. During the Vietnam War many Army nurses would see deployment to South East Asia. Army nurses would staff all major Army hospitals in the theatre, including: Cam Ranh Bay, Da Nang, and Saigon. Vietnam would be the first major deployment of men as nurses into the combat theater, as men could be located in more hazardous locations than what was considered safe for females. Many Army nurses faced enemy fire for the first time due to the unconventional nature of the conflict, and several nurses would die from direct enemy fire. On at least one occasion the US Army hospital at Cam Ranh Bay was assaulted and severely damaged, with a loss of both patient and staff life.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 57th Infantry Regiment was a unit in the Philippine Scouts. During their combat in Bataan members received 1 Medal of Honor, 21 Distinguished Service Crosses and 68 Silver Stars.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

56th Street Records logo in white ink homiez.

Tags: 56th-street-records, 56th-street, hotrock, supajoint

Description

OMG a 56th Street Easterbunny Tee printed in WEED yo!!

Tags: 420, marijuana, ma, weed, 56th-street-records

Description

The 56th Field Artillery Command was a brigade size element of the United States Army. The unit was constituted in 1942 with the last period of active service being 1970 through 1991. It was the only unit to field the nuclear Pershing missile system. This unique mission required an almost "Super Brigade" status which the Army accommodated in several regards. Their inactivation in June 1991 was in some measure a consequence of their own success. The culmination of their duties was to act, as directed, in accordance with the INF Treaty, as the United States eliminated her intermediate range nuclear forces.

Tags: vet, veteran, veterans, vets, retired

Description

The 56th Field Artillery Command was a brigade size element of the United States Army. The unit was constituted in 1942 with the last period of active service being 1970 through 1991. It was the only unit to field the nuclear Pershing missile system. This unique mission required an almost "Super Brigade" status which the Army accommodated in several regards. Their inactivation in June 1991 was in some measure a consequence of their own success. The culmination of their duties was to act, as directed, in accordance with the INF Treaty, as the United States eliminated her intermediate range nuclear forces.

Tags: vet, missile, veteran, vets, military

Description

The 56th Cavalry Brigade was a brigade of the Texas Army National Guard. Its legacy is carried by the modern-day 56th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. As part of a post First World War reorganization plan in 1919 the 51st through 59th Brigades were created and designated by the US Army as separate National Guard Cavalry Brigades, although they were notional units that existed mostly on paper. In 1936 new National Guard Cavalry Divisions were fashioned from pairing up the Cavalry Brigades. They formed the 21st (51st and 59th Cavalry Brigades), the 22nd (52d and 54th Cavalry Brigades), 23d (53d and 55th Cavalry Brigades), and the 24th (57th and 58th Cavalry Brigades) Cavalry Divisions. The remaining 56th Cavalry Brigade was designated a non-divisional Cavalry Brigade. In 1940, the US Government began considering the value of cavalry troops on the modern 20th Century battlefield. Although the fledgeling Armored Force was sorely in need of troops and funding, the Regular Army deemed the National Guard incapable of maintaining and repairing complex vehicles and the state governments and attendant National Guard and State Militia units refused to give up horse cavalry units. In November of 1940, the National Guard cavalry units were disbanded and its elements reorganized as mechanized and armored units. This left the 56th Cavalry Brigade as the sole remaining horse-cavalry unit. Its elements were the 112th and 124th Cavalry Regiments. Army Ground Forces eliminated the 56th Cavalry Brigade when no use for it developed overseas. Finally, in mid-1944, the Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 56th Cavalry Brigade, became the 56th Reconnaissance Troop, Mechanized. Its headquarters troop became the 56th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop, Mechanized, but did not see combat. The former brigade's cavalry regiments went on to fight in the Pacific and China-Burma-India theaters.

Tags: agent-carter, mexico, new, cavalry, penn

Description

The 61st Fighter Squadron was constituted as the 61st Pursuit Squadron as part of the 56th Pursuit Group at Savannah, Georgia, on 15 January 1941. The squadron immediately began training for its wartime missions under III Fighter Command, rapidly transitioning through the Seversky P-35, Curtiss P-36 Hawk, Bell P-39 Airacobra and Curtiss P-40 Warhawk aircraft. On 7 December 1941, the 61st stepped up to defend the Southeastern United States from anticipated enemy air attack while it converted to the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft and prepared to deploy overseas. In November 1942, P-47 Thunderbolt dive test pilots achieved 725 mph, faster than the speed of sound. The 61st Fighter Squadron is an active United States Air Force unit, assigned to the 56th Operations Group, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. It operates the F-35 Lightning II aircraft, conducting Instructor Pilot training. The 61st, known as the 'Top Dogs', fly F-35A aircraft, to train instructor pilots and initial qualification pilots for Air Combat Command assignments.

Tags: states, air-corps, aaf, united, usaaf

Description

The 56th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 28th Infantry Division, also known as the Independence Brigade, is a brigade combat team of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard. The 56th SBCT is one of nine Stryker Brigade Combat Teams in the United States Army and one of five brigades of the 28th Infantry Division. It is the only reserve component Stryker unit in the Army and provides light infantry land assets for both federal and state active duty missions. The federal mission is to deploy on short notice as part of the 28th Infantry Division and destroy, capture, or repel enemy forces using maneuver and shock effect. The state mission of the brigade is to serve the Governor and the citizens of the Commonwealth as needed in times of natural disaster or civil unrest. The 56th SBCT headquarters is located at Horsham Air Guard Station in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania.

Tags: agent-carter, independence, usarng, 28th, 56th

Description

The 56th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 28th Infantry Division, also known as the Independence Brigade, is a brigade combat team of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard. The 56th SBCT is one of nine Stryker Brigade Combat Teams in the United States Army and one of five brigades of the 28th Infantry Division. It is the only reserve component Stryker unit in the Army and provides light infantry land assets for both federal and state active duty missions. The federal mission is to deploy on short notice as part of the 28th Infantry Division and destroy, capture, or repel enemy forces using maneuver and shock effect. The state mission of the brigade is to serve the Governor and the citizens of the Commonwealth as needed in times of natural disaster or civil unrest. The 56th SBCT headquarters is located at Horsham Air Guard Station in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania.

Tags: agent-carter, independence, 28th, 56th, 100th

Description

The 56th Field Artillery Command was a brigade size element of the United States Army. The unit was constituted in 1942 with the last period of active service being 1970 through 1991. It was the only unit to field the nuclear Pershing missile system. This unique mission required an almost "Super Brigade" status which the Army accommodated in several regards. Their inactivation in June 1991 was in some measure a consequence of their own success. The culmination of their duties was to act, as directed, in accordance with the INF Treaty, as the United States eliminated her intermediate range nuclear forces.

Tags: 56th, military, artillery, missile, vet

Description

Still Having A Hoot After 56th years T-shirt for parents, couple

Tags: anniversaries, valentines-day, couples-christmas-gifts, hoot-after-years

Description

SAINT HOTROCK SUPAJOINT - PATRON SAINT OF WEED - THE MOST SACRED HERB this icon be fo like when ya be needin some that weed, or if ya lost ya lighter or some shit, or like maybe ya can use it fo money or bitchez too I guess yo, but it mostly be fo weed homie. Hail Mary Jane, fill my face, The joint be wit me Blessd be you above all them plants, an blessd be the buds a ya flower, Cannabis. Holy Mary Jane, Mother of God this shit DAF yo Blaze fo all us stonerz Now an at the hour of 4:20 Fo eva an eva an eva. Hook me up yo. Thanks homie. Aw yeah When ya prayer be answered an shit, jus be cool, cuz shit all good yo. Stay high. Smoke weed. SupaJoint.com 56thStreetRecords.com

Tags: 420-weed, stoned, bong, joint, blunt-hits

Description

This be the tshirt an merch artwork from my DVD called "Fakest, A Hip Hopera Mockumentary" yo. Fo fans a the flix an shit. - HotRock SupaJoint

Tags: joint, hiphop, hip-hop, stoner-rock, comedy

SupaJoint Fakest Baseball T-Shirt

by SupaJoint
$26 $20
Description

MP's in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, in addition to their roles as enforcers of law and order on military installations, fulfill a number of combat roles as well. Military Police in Afghanistan and Iraq have been widely employed for such duties as convoy security, mounted and dismounted patrols, maritime expeditionary warfare, Military Working Dog operations, security details for senior officers, and detainee handling. Army MPs, Navy MAs, Navy Sailors who possess the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) Code 2008 and 9575, Navy Sailors who have completed the Individual Augmentee (IA) training for Detention Operations, and Air Force Security Forces have been widely utilized as prison guards in detainee facilities, whereas Marine Corps MPs focus on securing and processing detainees before passing them on to Army holding facilities.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 79th Infantry Division ("Cross of Lorraine") was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. The division was first activated at Camp Meade, MD in August 1917, composed primarily of draftees from Maryland and Pennsylvania. After a year of training the division sailed overseas in July 1918. The 79th Division saw extensive combat in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive area where it earned the name of "Cross of Lorraine" for their defense of France. The division was inactivated June 1919 and returned to the United States. Throughout its entire World War I campaign, the division suffered 6,874 casualties with 1,151 killed and 5,723 wounded. Private Henry Gunther, the last American soldier to be killed in action during World War I, served with the 313th Infantry Regiment of the 79th Division

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

V Corps Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol Company, later Co. A, 75th Infantry (Ranger), was the longest serving DA authorized LRRP/Ranger Company in the US Army. The USA LRRP Co (Abn) 3779 was activated at Wildflecken, Germany by 7th Army on 15 JUL 61 to serve as V Corps LRRP Company in Germany. It was deactivated on 19 DEC 74 at Ft Hood as Company A, 75th Infantry (Ranger) where it was performing Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol work for the 1st Cavalry Division. The company was initially assigned to the 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment for administration and court-martial jurisdiction. At that time the company wore the 7th Army shoulder patch with blue and white Airborne tab and was the only unit near the East German border on jump status.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

Description

The 80th Training Command (Total Army School System) is a formation of the United States Army Reserve. During World War I and World War II, the unit was designated the 80th Infantry Division. Nicknamed the "Blue Ridge Division", it was initially composed of draftees from the mid-atlantic states of Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland. From 1946 to 1952, the 80th Division was redesignated the 80th Airborne Division. In May 1952, it was designated reserve infantry division and a reserve training division in March 1959. In 1994, the division was granted the designation, 80th Division (Institutional Training). On 1 October 2008 the Division underwent a major transformation and is now the 80th Training Command

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

A/75 was now a Ranger company but it had very few tabbed Rangers and it stayed that way. "It was a sore spot, but the company just could not get the training slots", Terry Roderick remembers. "Here we were, the big Ranger Company at Ft Benning, but we weren't Rangers, we were LRPs. It was a crock and we knew it." One benefit of being at Ft Benning was proximity to the jump and Pathfinder schools and many A/75 people made "recreational jumps" at the schools.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

Description

In June 1967, the LRRP Detachment became part of HHC 1st Cavalry Division. On 20 December, 1967, the LRRP Detachment was re-designated as Company E (LR), 52nd Infantry (ABN). On February 1, 1969 the unit was re-designated as Company H (Ranger), 75th Infantry (Abn). During mid 1971 for a two-month period, Company H was known as HHC Det. 10 (Ranger). The Lineage of Company H is now being carried by the 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 84th Training Command ("Railsplitters") is a formation of the United States Army. During World War I and World War II, it was known as the 84th Infantry Division. From 1946 to 1952, the division was a part of the United States Army Reserve as the 84th Airborne Division. In 1959, the division was reorganized and redesignated once more to the 84th Division. The division was headquartered in Milwaukee in command of over 4,100 soldiers divided into eight brigades—including an ROTC brigade—spread throughout seven states.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 90th Infantry Division ("Tough 'Ombres") was a unit of the United States Army that served in World War I and World War II. Its lineage is carried on by the 90th Sustainment Brigade. On 6 December 1944, the division pushed across the Saar River and established a bridgehead north of Saarlautern (present-day Saarlouis), 6–18 December, but with the outbreak of the Gerd von Rundstedt's (Army Group A) drive, the Battle of the Bulge, withdrew to the west bank on 19 December, and went on the defensive until 5 January 1945, when it shifted to the scene of the Ardennes struggle, having been relieved along the Saar River by the 94th Infantry Division. It drove across the Our River, near Oberhausen, 29 January, to establish and expand a bridgehead. In February, the division smashed through Siegfried Line fortifications to the Prüm River. After a short rest, the 90th continued across the Moselle River to take Mainz, 22 March, and crossed the rivers Rhine, the Main, and the Werra in rapid succession. Pursuit continued to the Czech border, 18 April 1945, and into the Sudetes mountain range. The division was en route to Prague when they came upon the remaining 1500 emaciated prisoners left behind by the SS at Flossenbürg concentration camp. Today, a memorial wall at the former camp honors the 90th as the liberators of Flossenbürg concentration camp.[2] A week later, word came that the war in Europe ended on 8 May 1945. On that same day, Erich Hartmann, the highest-scoring fighter ace in history, along with a squadron of the elite Jagdgeschwader 52 fighter wing (the highest-scoring fighter wing in history), surrendered to the 90th.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

On 13 January 69, Ranger teams combined with the Marines and Navy as security and cordon, labeled Operation Russell Beach, during operations at Bantangan Peninsula which was known as a VC stronghold approximately 15 miles from Quang Ngai City. On 1 February 1969, Company E (LRP) was realigned as Company G (RANGER), 75th Infantry (Airborne). Effective 2 February 1969, E 51st was deactivated. Team names were also changed to reflect states and cities. Cigarette names were no longer used. Effective 2 February 69, the unit continued to operate. The mission was still Long Range Patrol. It was during this time that the Company received its first recipient of the Medal Of Honor from the exploits of Staff Sergeant Robert Pruden who gave his life to protect his team members during an operation in the Due Pho area. Under G Company, the unit was also accredited with the location of more than 8,000 enemy soldiers, numerous enemy base camps, routes of inf1LTration and supply, caches and training sites. It conducted no less than 662 combat operations and was also accredited with 322 confirmed enemy kills, 106 enemy wounded in action, and 53 prisoners of war. The unit participated in the defense of Firebase Fat City, LZ Baldy, Chu Lai base and, indirectly, to the support of every battalion-sized combat unit in the Division. As the unit continued, other commanders were: CPTs Anthony Avgolis and Jon Hanson with 1SG Clifford Manning as the Company First Sergeant during 1970 - 1971.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

Description

The 85th Infantry Division also known as "Custer Division" (named after the cavalry commander George Armstrong Custer) was an infantry division of the United States Army. The division returned to the United States and was inactivated at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia on 26 August 1945. It was then reactivated at Chicago, Illinois on 19 February 1947 in the U.S. Army Reserve. On 1 June 1959, the division's mission was changed to training and it was named the 85th Infantry Division (Training). Upon reactivation in the Army Reserve, the division was organized with a division headquarters, three training brigades and a training group, with division headquarters located in Chicago, Illinois. In 1983, the Division Headquarters was moved to Arlington Heights, Illinois, with subordinate brigade headquarters located in Waukegan, Illinois (1st Brigade); St. Louis, Missouri (2nd Brigade); Rockford, Illinois (3rd Brigade); Fort Sheridan, Illinois (4th Brigade); and Aurora, Illinois (Training Group). In 1999 the division was further reorganized as the 85th Division (Training Support). Its four brigades were headquartered as follows: 1st Brigade(Training Support(TS)): 1st Simulations Exercise(SIMEX) Group; 2nd SIMEX Group; and 3rd Battalion(TS), 335th Regiment at Fort Sheridan, Illinois 2nd Brigade(TS): 1st Battalion(TS), 338th Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 411th Regiment(Logistics Support) at Fort McCoy, WI 3rd Brigade(TS): 1st Battalion(TS) and 2nd Battalion(TS), 335th Regiment; 2nd Battalion(TS), 338th Regiment; 3rd Battalion, 411th Regiment(Logistics Support) at Indianapolis, IN 4th Brigade(TS): 1st Battalion(TS) and 3rd Battalion(TS), 337th Regiment; 1st Battalion(TS), 409th Regiment; 1st Battalion(TS), 2nd Battalion(TS), and 3rd Battalion(TS) 410th Regiment; 1st Battalion, 411th Regiment(Logistics Support) at Fort Knox, KY.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

Company D (Ranger) 75th Infantry was formed on 20, November 1969, with a cadre of regular army personnel from Company D (Ranger) 151st Infantry, many of whom were veterans of other tours of duty in country. Major Richard W. Drisko was appointed as the Commander. The rangers referred to themselves as the "Delta Rangers" in conformity with the letter "D" of the ICAO phonetic alphabet adopted by the U.S. military in 1956. On 1 December, the new ranger company was placed under the operational control of the aerial 3d Squadron, 17th Cavalry. Intensive ranger training was conducted to prepare the new unit for combat reconnaissance operations. Each of the field platoons completed a seven-day preparatory program that included instruction on communications, map reading, tracking, prisoner snatches, demolitions, ambush techniques, sensor emplacement, and familiarization with repelling, rope ladders, and McGuire rigs. Four rangers were sent to the sniper school and graduated on 28 January 1970, giving the company sharpshooter capability for special countermeasure patrols. Ranger Company D was given the mission of providing corps-level ranger support to II Field Force Vietnam by collecting intelligence, interdicting supply routes, locating and destroying encampments, and uncovering cache sites. The ranger surveillance zone was expanded to encompass the former Indiana Ranger area of operations, as well as the Northeastern portion of the Catcher's Mitt western War Zone D in Bien Hoa and Long Khanh provinces. The Delta Rangers concentrated on ambush patrols but also performed point, area, and route reconnaissance with elements as small as three men.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

Description

On 1 February 1969, the department of the Army reorganized the 75th Infantry as the parent regiment for long-range patrol companies under the combat arms regimental system. Maj. Gen. Ewell activated Company E (Ranger), 75th Infantry, from Company E, 50th Infantry. The rangers were known as "Echo Rangers" or "Riverine Rangers," because they mostly dealt with riverine and canal reconnaissance - even though the company was only partially assigned to the Mobile Riverine Force. Ranger Company E took advantage of dry season conditions to harass suspected Viet Cong supply lines from activation until the end of April. The Riverine Rangers conducted 244 patrols and reported 134 observations of enemy activity. They clashed with the Viet Cong during 111 patrols and were credited with capturing five prisoners and killing 169 Viet Cong. When the 9th Infantry Division began phasing out of Vietnam in July 1969, the rangers renamed themselves "Kudzu Rangers" after the operational code word for the close-in defense of Dong Tam. The ranger company phased its teams out of the Kudzu business by 3 August.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

Description

The 78th Training Division (Operations) ("Lightning") is a unit of the United States Army which served in World War I and World War II as the 78th Infantry Division, and currently trains and evaluates units of the United States Army Reserve for deployment. In late 1999, the division was redesignated from 78th Division (Exercise) to 78th Division (Training Support) to reflect the growing change in the type of training provided by the division's units. There was also an associated change in the manning of the unit, adding National Guard personnel to the regulars and Army Reservists already assigned. This was one of the first instances of the growing multi-component organization of US Army units that deal with Reserve Component training and operations. In 1999, the 189th Infantry Brigade was reflagged as the 4th Brigade, 78th Division (TS) and merged with the existing 4th Brigade, 78th Division (Exercise). The reorganization created a unique unit consisting of active-component, National Guard, civilian and drilling US Army reservists. The 4th Brigade is a tenant unit on Fort Bragg with headquarters at the 78th Division (Training Support), Edison, New Jersey. The brigade's responsibility is to train, coach, teach and mentor the Reserve and Army National Guard units of North Carolina. The 4th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support) provides training assistance, support, and evaluation to priority Reserve Component units and all other units within capabilities. Synchronize training support within area of responsibility in order to enhance individual and unit readiness to meet directed mobilization and/or wartime requirements. On order, activate or augment mobilization assistance teams (MAT) to assist installation commanders in post-mobilization training and validation of mobilized units for deployment. On order, deploy a defense coordinating officer (DCO) and/or a defense coordinating element (DCE) to coordinate military support to civilian authorities (MSCA) during federal disaster response operations. Provide command and control of subordinate units. 1st BN (LS), 313th Regiment, 4th BDE, provides logistic support for a multi-component (AC/USAR/ARNG) training support brigade that conducts lanes training, TAM evals for priority RC client units; On order provides mobilization augmentation training and military support to civilian authorities.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 80th Training Command (Total Army School System) is a formation of the United States Army Reserve. During World War I and World War II, the unit was designated the 80th Infantry Division. Nicknamed the "Blue Ridge Division", it was initially composed of draftees from the mid-atlantic states of Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland. From 1946 to 1952, the 80th Division was redesignated the 80th Airborne Division. In May 1952, it was designated reserve infantry division and a reserve training division in March 1959. In 1994, the division was granted the designation, 80th Division (Institutional Training). On 1 October 2008 the Division underwent a major transformation and is now the 80th Training Command

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 86th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. Currently called the 86th Training Division, based at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, members of the division now work with Active Army, Reserve, and National Guard units to provide them with a Decisive Action Training Environment on a yearly basis. The division was nicknamed the "Black Hawk Division," named after the Sauk Leader Chief Black Hawk. Frederic McLaughlin, was a commander with the 333rd Machine Gun Battalion of the 86th Infantry Division during World War I. In 1926, McLaughlin would be granted a franchise by the National Hockey League, which he would put in his home town of Chicago. He named the team the Chicago Black Hawks after the unit. The 86th was redesignated as the HQ's 86th Training Brigade on 11 Feb 2009 and activated at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin on 16 September 2010. Shortly after its reactivation, on 18 September 2010, it was redesignated as Headquarters 86th Training Division.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 82nd Airborne Division is an airborne infantry division of the United States Army, specializing in parachute assault operations into denied areas. Based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the 82nd Airborne Division is part of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The 82nd Airborne Division is the U.S. Army's most strategically mobile formations. Recently the 82nd Airborne has been conducting operations in Iraq. The 82nd Airborne has been assigned to advise and assist Iraqi Security Forces

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The US Army currently employs six types of infantry: light infantry (consisting of four sub-types), "Stryker infantry", and mechanized infantry. The infantrymen themselves are essentially trained, organized, armed, and equipped the same, save for some having airborne, air assault, and/or Ranger qualification(s), the primary difference being in the organic vehicles (or lack thereof) assigned to the infantry unit, or the notional delivery method (i.e., parachute drop or heliborne) employed to place the infantryman on the battlefield. All modern US Army rifle platoons contain three nine-man rifle squads, with each type of infantry having a discrete TO&E.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Army - Infantry Baseball T-Shirt

by twix123844
$26 $20
Description

The VII Corps LRRP Co. (ABN) was one of the first two Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol Companies authorized at Army level. The other was attached to V Corps. It was activated at 7th Army in W. Germany on 09 June 1961, and was formed at Nellingen, W. Germany. The first Company Commander was Maj. Edward V. Maltese and the first First Sergeant was 1SGT Winston "Patty" Flynn. The company was initially designated the U.S. Army (3780) Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol Company, and came under Headquarters VII Corps Special Troops in Stuttgart, Germany for Administration and court martial jurisdiction, and worked directly for VII Corps G-2. The company was never an interim, provisional or TD unit. It was the first full-fledged LRRP Company. It had the largest area of responsibility for the deepest penetration, up to 150 Km behind enemy lines. Known informally as the JayHawk LRRPs, the company motto on its crest was "Eyes Behind the Lines." The company had the largest number of personnel of the LRRP outfits in Europe. It was also fully contained. Other than the personnel sent off to train on SADM emplacement, it had the facilities to train all its personnel in CW and all the field requirements of LRRP operations. Under the Command of its second CO, Maj. Edward M. Hunt, the VII Corps LRRP perfected many aspects of Long Range Reconnaissance Operations that are still in use today. Many of these techniques were incorporated into the first Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol Field Manual (FM 31-16).

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

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