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3rd Baseball T-Shirts

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I’M A 3RD GRADE TEACHER JUST LIKE A NORMAL TEACHER EXCEPT MUCH COOLER

Tags: best-selling, ew, cooler, funny, est-seller

Description

3RD GRADE TEACHER JUST LIKE A NORMAL TEACHER EXCEPT MUCH COOLER

Tags: 3rd-grade, eller, t-recent, trend, best-selling

Description

In June 1967, the LRRP Detachment became part of HHC 1st Cavalry Division. On 20 December, 1967, the LRRP Detachment was re-designated as Company E (LR), 52nd Infantry (ABN). On February 1, 1969 the unit was re-designated as Company H (Ranger), 75th Infantry (Abn). During mid 1971 for a two-month period, Company H was known as HHC Det. 10 (Ranger). The Lineage of Company H is now being carried by the 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Tags: 3rd, chem, chemical, brigade, bde

Description

The Aleutian Islands Campaign was a military campaign conducted by the United States in the Aleutian Islands, part of the Alaska Territory, in the American theater and the Pacific theater of World War II starting on 3 June 1942. A small Japanese force occupied the islands of Attu and Kiska, where the remoteness of the islands and the challenges of weather and terrain delayed for nearly a year a larger U.S./Canadian force to eject them. The islands' strategic value was their ability to control Pacific transportation routes, which is why U.S. General Billy Mitchell stated to the U.S. Congress in 1935, "I believe that in the future, whoever holds Alaska will hold the world. I think it is the most important strategic place in the world." The Japanese reasoned that control of the Aleutians would prevent a possible U.S. attack across the Northern Pacific. Similarly, the U.S. feared that the islands would be used as bases from which to launch aerial assaults against the West Coast. A battle to reclaim Attu was launched on May 11, 1943 and completed following a final Japanese banzai charge on May 29. On 15 August 1943, an invasion force landed on Kiska in the wake of a sustained three-week barrage, only to discover that the Japanese had withdrawn from the island on July 29.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 90th Infantry Division ("Tough 'Ombres") was a unit of the United States Army that served in World War I and World War II. Its lineage is carried on by the 90th Sustainment Brigade. On 6 December 1944, the division pushed across the Saar River and established a bridgehead north of Saarlautern (present-day Saarlouis), 6–18 December, but with the outbreak of the Gerd von Rundstedt's (Army Group A) drive, the Battle of the Bulge, withdrew to the west bank on 19 December, and went on the defensive until 5 January 1945, when it shifted to the scene of the Ardennes struggle, having been relieved along the Saar River by the 94th Infantry Division. It drove across the Our River, near Oberhausen, 29 January, to establish and expand a bridgehead. In February, the division smashed through Siegfried Line fortifications to the Prüm River. After a short rest, the 90th continued across the Moselle River to take Mainz, 22 March, and crossed the rivers Rhine, the Main, and the Werra in rapid succession. Pursuit continued to the Czech border, 18 April 1945, and into the Sudetes mountain range. The division was en route to Prague when they came upon the remaining 1500 emaciated prisoners left behind by the SS at Flossenbürg concentration camp. Today, a memorial wall at the former camp honors the 90th as the liberators of Flossenbürg concentration camp.[2] A week later, word came that the war in Europe ended on 8 May 1945. On that same day, Erich Hartmann, the highest-scoring fighter ace in history, along with a squadron of the elite Jagdgeschwader 52 fighter wing (the highest-scoring fighter wing in history), surrendered to the 90th.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

Public Affairs is a term for the formal offices of the branches of the United States Department of Defense whose purpose is to deal with the media and community issues. The term is also used for numerous media relations offices that are created by the U.S. military for more specific limited purposes. Public affairs offices are staffed by a combination of officers, enlisted personnel, civilian officials and contract professionals. Public Affairs offices play a key role in contingency and deployed operations. The typical Public Affairs office is led by an officer who is in charge of planning, budgeting for, executing and evaluating the effectiveness of public affairs programs, and provides public affairs advice, counsel and support for commanders and senior staff members.

Tags: agent-carter, regt, sqdrn, squadron, regiment

Description

The 31st Infantry Division was a unit of the Army National Guard in World War I and World War II. It was originally activated as the 10th, a division established in early 1917 consisting of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia national guardsmen. By the end of that same year, the 10th Division became the 31st. In World War II, national guardsmen from Mississippi were included in the division. When the Korean War broke out in 1950, small units and individual leaders were sent to Korea as replacements from the activated 31st Infantry Division ("Dixie"). No units were deployed, but individuals representing three-fourths of the authorized strength were sent to either Korea or Japan. The 31st Infantry Division was transferred to Fort Carson, Colorado in February 1954 from Camp Atterbury. The 31st Division as an active service formation was then reflagged as the 8th Infantry Division on 15 June 1954. The 31st Infantry (NGUS) Division was effectively reformed with units from Alabama and Mississippi. It served as a National Guard division until its inactivation on 14 January 1968. Alabama Army National Guard units subsequently became a part of the 30th Armored Division (“Volunteers”). The 31st Armored Division transitioned to a brigade in the late 1960s serving through the three decades as a separate armored brigade. In 2002 it started transitioning to a chemical brigade, initially designated the 122nd. In November 2002 the brigade was redesignated the 31st Chemical Brigade.

Description

The 130th Engineer Brigade is an engineer brigade of the United States Army based in Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. It provides engineering support to the United States Army Pacific command. The brigade specializes in bridging operations. The brigade traces its lineage back to an engineering regiment active during World War II, but the brigade itself did not see action until the mid-1990s. As a part of the V Corps for most of the Cold War, the brigade was stationed in western Europe for decades as a deterrent to a possible Soviet invasion. It finally saw action during Operation Joint Endeavor, providing bridging assistance for the international force in the Bosnia region. Several years later, the brigade was the primary engineering component during the invasion of Iraq in 2003. With numerous difficulties, the brigade was forced to take on several unexpected missions during its year in Iraq. It saw a second tour in 2005 and a third in 2009 in which it once again was the primary engineering component in the country. The brigade deployed to Afghanistan as the Theater Engineer Brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from 2013-2014. The brigade had a long history of supporting V Corps of United States Army Europe from 1969 until 2007, during which it was based at Warner Barracks in the Bavarian town of Bamberg, Germany. That ended when the brigade was relocated to Hawaii to support United States Army Pacific as part of a major restructuring plan of the US Army. Reactivated in 2008, the brigade is currently at home in Hawaii.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 3rd Cavalry Regiment, formerly 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (sometimes 3d) ("Brave Rifles"[1]) is a regiment of the United States Army currently stationed at Fort Hood, TX. The regiment has a history in the United States Army that dates back to 19 May 1846, when it was constituted in the Regular Army as the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. This unit was reorganized at the start of the American Civil War as the 3rd U.S. Cavalry Regiment on 3 August 1861. In January 1943, the regiment was re-designated as the 3rd Cavalry Group (Mechanized). Today they are equipped with Stryker vehicles. The 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment was the last heavy armored cavalry regiment in the U.S. Army until it officially became a Stryker regiment on 16 November 2011. It will retain its lineage as the 3rd Cavalry Regiment.

Tags: iraq, iraqi, operation, patch, div

Description

The 15th United States Infantry Regiment is a parent regiment in the United States Army. It has a lineage tracing back to the American Civil War, having participated in many battles.

Tags: regt, regiment, service, campaign, v

Description

Long Range Surveillance (LRS) (pronounced "lurse") are elite, specially-trained surveillance units of the United States Army employed for clandestine military operations by the Military Intelligence for gathering direct human intelligence information deep within enemy territory. Classic LRS employment is to infiltrate deep into enemy territory, construct hide and surveillance sites, and provide continuous surveillance/special reconnaissance of an intelligence target of key interest. LRS teams allow 24-hour surveillance and analysis coverage unlike Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), manned aircraft, and most satellites. Assuming there is no mission compromise, these teams typically remain in position for up to 6 days, as determined by the availability of food and water.

Tags: military, insignia, crest, distinctive, unit

Description

V Corps Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol Company, later Co. A, 75th Infantry (Ranger), was the longest serving DA authorized LRRP/Ranger Company in the US Army. The USA LRRP Co (Abn) 3779 was activated at Wildflecken, Germany by 7th Army on 15 JUL 61 to serve as V Corps LRRP Company in Germany. It was deactivated on 19 DEC 74 at Ft Hood as Company A, 75th Infantry (Ranger) where it was performing Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol work for the 1st Cavalry Division. The company was initially assigned to the 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment for administration and court-martial jurisdiction. At that time the company wore the 7th Army shoulder patch with blue and white Airborne tab and was the only unit near the East German border on jump status.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

Description

In July 2002, 1-504 PIR deployed to Afghanistan with the Task Force (TF) Panther (3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division) in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Areas of operation included Kandahar, Bagram Air Base, FOB Shkin, FOB Salerno, FOB Asadabad, and others. In December 2002 to January 2003, TF Devil (1st Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division), including both 2-504 PIR and 3-504 PIR replaced TF Panther. In January 2003, 2-504 PIR was operating from Bagram Air Base, while the 3-504 PIR was operating from Kandahar Air Base, Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The 1-504 PIR deployed again with TF Panther in September 2003 to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Areas of Operation included FOB Murcury, Fallujah, Abu Ghraib (surrounding environs) and al Karma. In January 2004, TF Devil deployed to Iraq with 2-504 PIR and 3-504 PIR. The 2-504 PIR conducted operations in southern Baghdad, while most of 3-504 PIR conducted security of Balad Air Base, and Company C, 3-504 PIR conducted security of Cedar II near Talil Air Base. In July 2005, 2-504 PIR was operating in Afghanistan close to the Pakistan border. In October 2005, 1st Battalion, 504 Parachute Infantry Regiment "Red Devils" deployed to Kurdistan in Northern Iraq in order to establish and run a maximum security detention facility for high risk detainees.

Tags: regt, insignia, military, 3rd, 1st

Description

From 1953 to 1971, the 7th Infantry Division defended the Korean Demilitarized Zone. Its main garrison was Camp Casey, South Korea. During these occupation duties, the division saw a complete reorganization in compliance with the Reorganization Objective Army Divisions plan. The division's former headquarters company grew into the 1st Brigade, 7th Infantry Division while the 13th Infantry Brigade was reactivated as the 2nd Brigade, 7th Infantry Division. The 14th Infantry Brigade was reactivated as the 3rd Brigade, 7th Infantry Division. In 1965 the division received its distinctive unit insignia, which alluded to its history during the Korean War.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

The 3rd Engineer Battalion is a unit of the United States Army that deploys to designated contingency areas and conducts combat and/or stability operations in support of a brigade combat team. It is a divisional mechanized combat engineer unit, composed of two combat engineer companies, one signal, one military intelligence, and a headquarters company. Its mission is to provide assured mobility, counter-mobility, general engineering, survivability support, military intelligence, and connectivity support to deploy anywhere at any time. The unit’s history spans 1901 to present day.

Tags: combat, engineer, en, eng, 3rd

Tags: 3rd, chem, chemical, brigade, bde

Description

June, 6 1944, the 2nd Infantry Division crossed the channel to land on Omaha Beach on D plus 2 (8 June 1944) near St. Laurent-sur-Mer. Attacking across the Aure River on 10 June, the division liberated Trévières and proceeded to assault and secure Hill 192, a key enemy strong point on the road to Saint-Lô. After three weeks of fortifying the position and by order of Commanding General Walter M. Robertson the order was given to take Hill 192. On 11 July under the command of Col.Ralph Wise Zwicker the 38th Infantry Regiment and with the 9th and the 23rd by his side the battle began at 5:45am. Using an artillery concept from World War I (rolling barrage) and with the support of 25,000 rounds of HE/WP that were fired by 8 artillery battalions, the hill was taken. Except for three days during the Battle of the Bulge, this was the heaviest expenditure of ammunition by the 38th Field Artillery Battalion; And was the only time during the 11 months of combat that 2nd Division Artillery used a rolling barrage. The division went on the defensive until 26 July. After exploiting the Saint-Lo breakout, the 2nd Division then advanced across the (Vire) to take (Tinhebray) on 15 August 1944. The division then raced toward (Brest/France), the heavily defended port fortress which happened to be a major port for German U-Boats. After 39 days of fighting the battle was won, and was the first place the Army Air Forces used bunker busting bombs.[

Tags: ng, guard, national, id, div

Description

The 327th GIR was formed at Camp Claiborne Louisiana August 15, 1942. They arrived in the ETO on September 15, 1943 and entered combat on June 6, 1944. The men spent 214 days in combat. 101st Airborne Division Commander: Major General Maxwell Taylor. (Replaced Brig. General William Lee after his heart attack in March 1944) 327th Regimental Commander: Colonel Joseph H. Harper (replaced Colonel George Wear, who was relieved of command on June 9, 1944).

Tags: div, iv, iii, ii, i

Description

Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 (VMFA-121) is a United States Marine Corps aircraft squadron operating the F-35B Lightning II. The squadron is based at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona and falls under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 13 (MAG-13) and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (3rd MAW).

Tags: eagle, wimgs-the, of, republic, arvn

Description

The 1st and 3rd Battalions deployed to Iraq with the 3d Infantry Division in 2003 and again in 2005–06, with one battalion falling under the 42nd Infantry Division. The 1st Battalion deployed to Iraq for the third time in March 2007. The 3rd Battalion was deactivated and reflagged the same year at Fort Stewart, Georgia. In 2009 the 3rd Battalion was reactivated at Fort Stewart. The 1st Battalion deployed to Iraq in 2009 assuming responsibility for operations in ad-Diwaniyah and an-Najaf for Operation Iraqi Freedom VII and Operation New Dawn.

Tags: service, campaign, v, iv, iii

Description

The 1st and 3rd Battalions deployed to Iraq with the 3d Infantry Division in 2003 and again in 2005–06, with one battalion falling under the 42nd Infantry Division. The 1st Battalion deployed to Iraq for the third time in March 2007. The 3rd Battalion was deactivated and reflagged the same year at Fort Stewart, Georgia. In 2009 the 3rd Battalion was reactivated at Fort Stewart. The 1st Battalion deployed to Iraq in 2009 assuming responsibility for operations in ad-Diwaniyah and an-Najaf for Operation Iraqi Freedom VII and Operation New Dawn.

Tags: service, campaign, v, iv, iii

Description

The 81st Infantry Division ("Wildcat") was an infantry division of the United States Army that was mobilized for service in both World War I and World War II. The division was inactivated in 1965 and remains on the inactive list of the United States Army. The 81st Infantry Division landed in Hawaii, 11 June-8 July 1944. The division minus Regimental Combat Team (RCT) 323 invaded Angaur Island in the Palau group, as part of the Palau Islands campaign 17 September, and pushed through to the western shore in a quick movement, cutting the island in half. The enemy was driven into isolated pockets and mopping-up operations began on 20 September. RCT 321, attached to the 1st Marine Division, went into action on Peleliu Island in the Palaus and assisted in splitting defense forces and isolating them in mountainous areas in the central part of the island. The team aided in mopping up Ngesebus Island and capturing Kongauru and Garakayo Islands. RCT 323 under naval task force command occupied the Ulithi atoll, 21–23 September 1944. Elements of the team landed on Ngulu Atoll and destroyed enemy personnel and installations, 16 October, completing the outflanking of the enemy base at Yap. On 18 October, RCT 323 left to rejoin the 81st on Peleliu, which assumed command of all troops on that island and Angaur, 20 October 1944. Resistance was ended on Peleliu, 27 November. Between 4 November 1944 and 1 January 1945, the division seized Pulo Anna Island, Kyangel Atoll, and Pais Island. The 81st left in increments from 1 January to 8 February for New Caledonia for rehabilitation and training. The division arrived in Leyte on 17 May 1945, and after a period of training participated in mopping-up operations in the northwest part of the island, 21 July 1945 to 12 August 1945. After rest and training, the 81st moved to Japan, 18 September, and performed occupation duties in Aomori Prefecture until inactivation.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

The 3rd Engineer Battalion is a unit of the United States Army that deploys to designated contingency areas and conducts combat and/or stability operations in support of a brigade combat team. It is a divisional mechanized combat engineer unit, composed of two combat engineer companies, one signal, one military intelligence, and a headquarters company. Its mission is to provide assured mobility, counter-mobility, general engineering, survivability support, military intelligence, and connectivity support to deploy anywhere at any time. The unit’s history spans 1901 to present day.

Tags: military, insignia, vet, vets, veteran

Description

Long Range Surveillance (LRS) (pronounced "lurse") are elite, specially-trained surveillance units of the United States Army employed for clandestine military operations by the Military Intelligence for gathering direct human intelligence information deep within enemy territory. Classic LRS employment is to infiltrate deep into enemy territory, construct hide and surveillance sites, and provide continuous surveillance/special reconnaissance of an intelligence target of key interest. LRS teams allow 24-hour surveillance and analysis coverage unlike Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), manned aircraft, and most satellites. Assuming there is no mission compromise, these teams typically remain in position for up to 6 days, as determined by the availability of food and water.

Tags: military, insignia, crest, distinctive, unit

Description

Currently, the 519th Military Police Battalion is located on Fort Polk, Louisiana where it is preparing for future deployments. From its inception, the 519th Military Police Battalion has received credit for fourteen combat campaigns. The citations include, the Meritorious Unit Commendation (1950 - 1951 Korea), a second Meritorious Unit Commendation (1952 – 1953 Korea), Republic of Korea Presidential Citation (19 Sep 1950 - 21 Jul 1952 Korea), the Army Superior Unit Award (Apr - Sep 1988 Panama), a third Meritorious Unit Commendation (6 Oct 1990 - 24 Mar 1991 Desert Shield/Storm), and a second Army Superior Unit Award (10 Apr 1994 - 7 Nov 1996 Bosnia). The HHD has been nominated for the Army Superior Unit Award (10 Jan – 10 Jul 02) for actions conducted in Afghanistan.

Tags: military, insignia, crest, distinctive, unit

Description

Reorganized 1 September, 1961 to consist of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Howitzer Battalions, 5th Target Acquistion Battalion, and Battery A. Reorganized 1 December, 1965 to consist of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Howitzer Battalions, 5th Battalion, and Battery A. Reorganized 1 March, 1966 to consist of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Howitzer Battalions, 5th Battalion, and Batteries A and F. Reorganized 1 February, 1968 to consist of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Howitzer Battalions, 5th Battalion, and Batteries A and F. Reorganized 1 March, 1968 to consist of the 1st and 2nd Howitzer Battalions, 4th and 5th Battalions, and Batteries A and F. Reorganized 1 may, 1968 to consist of the 2nd, 4th, and 5th Battalions and Battery A. (2nd Battalion, 138th Field Artillery ordered into active Federal service 13 May, 1968 at home stations). Reorganized 1 May, 1969 to consist of the 2nd and 5th Battalions and Battery A. (2nd Battalion, 138th Field Artillery released 24 October, 1969 from active Federal service and revcerted to state control). Redesignated 1 March, 1972 as the 138th Field Artillery. Reorganized 1 May, 1974 to consist of the 2nd Battalion. Reorganized 1 November, 1980 to consist of the 2nd Battalion, an element of the 149th Separate Armored Brigade. Reorganized 1 November, 1985 to consist of the 2nd Battalion, an element of the 35th Infantry Division. Withdrawn 1 June, 1989 from Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System.

Tags: soldier, policeman, ribbon, platoon, company

Description

The 3rd Chemical Brigade is a training brigade of the United States Army based at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, retaining for historic reasons its name.

Tags: mopp, cbr, bde, chem, brigade

Description

The 31st Infantry Division was a unit of the Army National Guard in World War I and World War II. It was originally activated as the 10th, a division established in early 1917 consisting of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia national guardsmen. By the end of that same year, the 10th Division became the 31st. In World War II, national guardsmen from Mississippi were included in the division.

Tags: iv, iii, ii, i, freedom

Description

The 3rd Chemical Brigade was first constituted on 1 January 1942 as the 3rd Chemical Battalion.[2] It was activated at Fort Benning, Georgia. The unit was reorganized and redesignated as the 3rd Chemical Mortar Battalion on 11 March 1945. It was inactivated on 2 January 1946 at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia. The unit reactivated at Fort Bragg, North Carolina on 18 September 1950, but again inactivated there on 5 February 1953. On 20 September 1989, the unit was disbanded. The unit reconstituted on 1 October 1999 in the Regular Army and was redesignated as 3rd Chemical Brigade. Command of the unit was transferred to the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command, and activated at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Tags: 3rd, chem, chemical, bde, brigade

Description

On 1 February 1969, the department of the Army reorganized the 75th Infantry as the parent regiment for long-range patrol companies under the combat arms regimental system. Maj. Gen. Ewell activated Company E (Ranger), 75th Infantry, from Company E, 50th Infantry. The rangers were known as "Echo Rangers" or "Riverine Rangers," because they mostly dealt with riverine and canal reconnaissance - even though the company was only partially assigned to the Mobile Riverine Force. Ranger Company E took advantage of dry season conditions to harass suspected Viet Cong supply lines from activation until the end of April. The Riverine Rangers conducted 244 patrols and reported 134 observations of enemy activity. They clashed with the Viet Cong during 111 patrols and were credited with capturing five prisoners and killing 169 Viet Cong. When the 9th Infantry Division began phasing out of Vietnam in July 1969, the rangers renamed themselves "Kudzu Rangers" after the operational code word for the close-in defense of Dong Tam. The ranger company phased its teams out of the Kudzu business by 3 August.

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 4th, to

Description

The 95th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army. Today it exists as the 95th Training Division, a component of the United States Army Reserve headquartered at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Activated too late to deploy for World War I, the division remained in the Army's reserve until World War II, when it was sent to Europe. Renowned for fighting back fierce German counterattacks, the division earned the nickname "Iron Men of Metz" for fighting to liberate and defend the town. After World War II, the division spent another brief period in reserve before being activated as one of the Army's training divisions. Over the next fifty years the division would see numerous changes to its structure as its training roles changed and subordinate units shifted in and out of its command. It activated a large number of regimental and brigade commands to fulfill various training roles. The division then began conducting one station unit training, a responsibility it continues to this day.

Tags: agent-carter, star, 6th, pers, personnel

Description

steppin' to the a.m. - 3rd bass

Tags: golden-age, hip-hop, classic, culture, hiphop

Description

The 82nd Airborne Division is an airborne infantry division of the United States Army, specializing in parachute assault operations into denied areas. Based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the 82nd Airborne Division is part of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The 82nd Airborne Division is the U.S. Army's most strategically mobile formations. Recently the 82nd Airborne has been conducting operations in Iraq. The 82nd Airborne has been assigned to advise and assist Iraqi Security Forces. The division was constituted, originally as the 82nd Division, in the National Army on 5 August 1917, shortly after the American entry into World War I, and was organized on 25 August 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia and later served with distinction on the Western Front in the final months of World War I. Since its initial members came from all 48 states, the unit acquired the nickname All-American, which is the basis for its famed "AA" shoulder patch. The division later served in World War II where, in August 1942, it was reconstituted as the first airborne division of the U.S. Army and fought in numerous campaigns during the war, gaining an excellent reputation

Tags: 6th, pers, personnel, 75th, 4th

Description

80s and 90s hip-hop knows.

Tags: new-york, ny, queens, brooklyn, pop-goes-the-weasel

The Gas Face Baseball T-Shirt

by Kwamster
$26 $20
Description

Photo edit Artist: Gunther J

Tags: vortex, snail, space

Cosmic Snail Baseball T-Shirt

by 3rdEyeEvolutionaries
$26 $20
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